Anthroposofische Herstellungsverfahren

 

Anthroposofie and Production of remedies

 

[Ehrenfried E. Pfeiffer and Erica Sabarth]

In medieval chemical manuscripts descriptions of how to produce chemical and therapeutical substances spoke of the "repetition" of one and the same procedure, a process which might appear unnecessary to the chemist of today because seemingly no new transformation resulted from it. This procedure mainly concerned processes of dissolving and distillation. Yet the old literature makes it clear that these processes, when repeated in definite rhythms, have the effect of purifying the substance involved and intensifying the intended process. The repetition of the distillation process is reported to purify the substance more and more and, thus, make it receptive to "fixation" of the world-spirit. When elaborating on the production of metal mirrors. Dr. Steiner explained that a substance undergoing distillations is brought back to its cosmic origin and rendered able to receive cosmic forces.

One can well imagine that a single distillation may not be sufficient when one considers the strong relationship to the physical conditions, the permeation with not only material impurities but also with earth processes - for example, the raw technical production and manufacturing. The purely chemical rectification requires several repetitions. In the old instructions - as indicated many times by R.S. - the distillation products are reunited with the original substance so that no purification – in the sense of "removal of impurities" - seems to take place. Thus the processes themselves are influenced.

Can one verify the effects of such distillation processes through an experimental test? One can study the effects on a human being of a remedy in its various stages of preparation. Such experiments are time consuming and difficult to interpret. Or one can study plants in their reaction to growth and shape, as in growth tests with legumes (peas). This also is time consuming and shows only a detail of all the possible effects of the remedy.

The most suitable, practical way seemed to be to use the method of Sensitive Crystallization and to study the "biography" of the remedy with single crystallization pictures. This provided an opportunity to observe both an obvious effect and a specific influence.

Concerning the method and its possible applications, we refer you to the book. Sensitive Crystallization Processes, A Demonstration of Formative Forces in the Blood by E. Pfeiffer in which medical consequences of this method are specifically represented.

Through the kindness of Weleda, Arlesheim we received an insight into the production processes of remedy No. 20 (Kalium aceticum cum Stibio. w). This remedy is especially suitable for studying the problems referred to earlier.

 

In brief, the indications for the production are:

1.     "distilled wine vinegar is poured onto Tartar (Potassium tartrate) and distilled off several times so that, after the distillation, it tastes as sour as at the start.

2.     Then Antimony is finely ground together with the above end product.

3.     Next, an alcoholic extract of Crocus sativus is added to the powder and this again treated by distillations.

4.     Further distillations with pure alcohol follow until the "spiritus" no longer shows a red color.

5.     Then Coral is finely pulverized together with this intermediate product, covered again with alcohol and distilled. This has to be repeated several times until finally there results the finished remedy."

 

To investigate the effect of the formative forces which might accompany the whole process, a small amount was taken each time from all the single intermediate states, added in high dilution to a 5% solution of copper chloride (CuCI2) and crystallized according to the established method. The resulting crystalizations showed that, with the help of the obtained form, pictures of each single stage of the whole process could

be clearly fixed as to its effect; especially the last stage in each case can be observed as a specific and characteristic form-picture.

 

The single stages are shown in crystallization pictures:

1. Distilled wine vinegar, 5 drops added to 10 cc of copper chloride solution This picture shows hardly any activity of formative forces. It concerns a chemical product without any specific characteristics. In its tendency the wine vinegar may have something plant-like in the direction of flower and fruit forms, but they cannot manifest properly. Observe especially the center area of this picture for a later comparison.

2. 0.05% solution of the salt of tartar added to the CuCl2 solution. Here appears quite a different character of forms: sharply contoured needles, concentrated to small but not very clearly delineated centers which are distributed over the surface. However, a unifying centralization towards one center is missing. It is the typical picture of a substance which has precipitated after fermentation. Such forms are obtained with the crystallization of substances resulting from various fermentation or putrefaction processes; that is, one can recognize a phase of a certain natural process but without being able to see any specific, individual characteristics of the substance in question.

Whoever is surprised by such conclusions is referred to the book mentioned above on how far-reaching conclusions can be drawn from the form pictures and also consider that we can look back on an empirical material of many thousands of crystallization pictures.

3. After 1st distillation with wine vinegar. A strong change can be observed in this picture. The sharp tartarus-type needles are still retained near the border; but towards the center of the picture a new form reveals itself: this has a more plant-like character. We can recognize a tendency in picture No. 1 -even if not quite distinct- is apparent in the center. Here this form manifests itself more obviously.

4. After 2nd distillation. The needles are more and more overwhelmed from the other, new form principle and kind of "ennobled." The hard, sharp fermentation character loses itself.

5. After 3rd distillation. The character of the single needles, due to the tartarus, vanishes. Also, the form of the wine vinegar cannot be found any more. Instead, a new principle enters, a unifying element, which arranges the crystals more and more towards one center.

6. After 4th distillation. As compared with the previous one, this picture shows no more improvement in centralization. The single forms become slightly finer and again approach the more plant-like forms. Judging from this picture, no more distillation is necessary.

7. Addition of Antimony, 0.005 g to 5% CuCl2 solution. A new form element is now introduced. Considered by itself, this shows a striking character: a very distinct general center with fine, feathery, wing-like forms, the picture of the pure effect of etheric forces out of the vegetative growth sphere.

8. The preparation which had undergone the four distillations is now triturated with Antimony and a small amount of the mixture added to the crystallization. At first, there appears a complete chaotization of the forms, a kind of regression. In spite of this, the centered character remains.

9. A further element is introduced: Crocus sativus, three drops added to the crystallization. The resulting picture shows abundant chaotic plant forms which, again, have as their single distinguishing characteristic a tendency towards the plant-like.

10. Crocus sativus, extracted with alcohol, is added to the mixture of the preparation gained at stage 8 and distilled for the first time. As a result, we see a battlefield of different forms, struggling and superimposing on one another, forms which we saw in details from the earlier pictures.

11. After 2nd distillation with alcohol. The form picture starts to order and balance itself.

12. After 3rd distillation. One could say a new creation of forms becomes visible. The previous little centers disappear more and more and make room for a completely new kind of form - the product of all the previous form elements working together.

13. After 4th distillation. The new form character receives still more fixation and creates a form now completely directed to one center point. From the character, one recognizes that the Antimony has asserted itself completely on the plant level. The mixture is now again able to take up a new element.

14. Addition of Coral 0.05% to the crystallization. Here again the feathery type of disordered crystals.

15. The trituration of the substance (from picture 13) with Coral (picture 14) reveals again a completely chaotic picture as a first reaction. One could nearly think that all the previous efforts were in vain.

16. After distillation of above mixture with alcohol. The chaos starts quickly to take form.

17. After the second distillation the center point is clearly revealed. We have now very finely-formed crystals.

18. A completely unified picture radiating from one center results out of the third distillation. All the different forces are brought into balance with each other. It is striking for the knowing observer to see the relationship of this picture to a normal human blood picture. It shows that the highest possibility of balance is reached and the remedy is, in fact, finished. The process has reached its desire end.

This experimental series shows that, with the help of the Sensitive Crystallization method it is possible to follow up the separate stages in the preparation of a compound remedy and especially observe the interaction of the formative forces, their progressive accommodation to one another and the ultimate harmonization. Furthermore, it is evident that such a process gives an image of the whole path of development towards the normal.

 

Folgendes hat anthroposofische Einschlüße

Frei nach: Markus Sommer, M.D.

R.S.: developed a differentiated range of organ preparations for parenteral use. Before that, animal organs had been used in medicine for thousands of years.

R.S. suggested brain preparations: cerebellum/pineal/lamina quadrigemina [of colliculi]/medulla oblongata/mesencephalon. Later extended to include several hundred organs and parts of organs.

Arrhythmias: 1. Fasciculus atrioventricularis D 8, 2. C or D 8.

One is tempted to ask if such a vast range is really necessary (at a time when there have been demands to sift the range of medicines) and if the organism is really able to make such subtle distinctions between organs and even subunits of organs. Even sophisticated chemical analysis will not always show differences between the ground substances of different organ preparations.

Research has yielded some impressive answers, e.g. investigation of the causes of NSA (= neuralgic shoulder amyotrophy) a rare condition resulting in pain followed by muscular weakness and atrophy

in the region of the shoulder, thoracic wall and upper arm, generally on one side only. Sierra et al., assuming this to involve autoimmune processes, have done lymphocyte transformation tests, incubating lymphocytes from NSA patients with extracts (protein concentration in D 6 potency range) of the long thoracic nerve, upper brachial plexus, distal median nerve and sacral plexus from human cadavers.

All lymphocytes responded with marked stimulation to preparations from the long thoracic nerve, those of some patients responded to a lesser degree to the brachial plexus and median nerve preparations, whereas the sacral plexus only elicited a weak response in exceptional cases. It appeared that a patient's lymphocytes would react with preparations of that patient's nerves which had also undergone pathological changes.

Histologic and chemical analysis would be unlikely to differentiate between those nerves the way even parts of the (morbid) organism appear to be able. Here we have scientific evidence of the "mutual awareness of organs" described by R.S./Ita Wegeman. Diseases involving changes in immune mechanisms may, in fact, be seen as prototypes in this respect. Allergy, for instance, involves a high degree

of antigen specificity, yet there is no definite dose-effect relationship at the interindividual level. High dilutions of the allergen are used to desensitize patients. In a recently-reported double blind trial

with asthma patients using highly sophisticated methods, D. Reilly et al. showed that the allergen potentized to a level where it can no longer be assumed to be present (C 30) will give significant symptomatic improvement. 

Similarly, organ preparations have highly selective stimulant or depressant effects on homologous organ structures, often giving remarkable results in clinical use. The paper by Sierra et al. shows that immunologic processes are selectively stimulated by homologous nerve tissue. It is evidently also possible to influence the organ concerned with homeopathic potencies of the homologous organ preparation. The action may be depressant if relatively high potencies are used -a case of treating bronchospasm with Plexus pulmonalis D 15 has been reported- or stimulant if low potencies are used.

Thus Rudolf Sterner suggested that a patient with postencephalitic Parkinson's disease should be given potentized midbrain (which contains substantia nigra).

Indirect evidence of the importance of a differentiated range of medicines may be as important for official recognition of the need for a differentiated range of medicines as it is for stimulating our

clinical powers of imagination, e.g. to treat NSA with Plexus brachialis.

 

Metallspiegel-Verfahren erzeugt Nanopartikel.

 

Folgendes hat anthroposofische Einschlüße

Frei nach: Dr. Johannes Zwieauer

The ability of warmth to transform substances has been used since primeval times to modify the material world (metal mining/glass blowing/pottery). The ability of warmth to transform substance is also used in the manufacture of remedies; activating processes latent in the substances themselves, which can become healing forces. Through the medium of warmth substances of nature can be directed to

the human organism. Anthroposophical medi­cines are almost always made with one or the other of the following warmth processes:

1. Digestio.  a pharma­ceutical process employing mild warmth, specifically the warming of plant juices to blood temperature. In nature plant sub­stances are exposed to seasonal and diurnal temperature rhythms but the pharmacist can maintain constant levels of warmth in the laboratory. The human organism also does this; taking substances out of their ac­customed temperature rhythms and into a constant temperature. Just how vital the maintenance of normal body temperature is becomes clear in that a deviation by just a few degrees from it makes human life dys­functional or impossible. The process of digestio leads to a "humanization" of plant matter. Approaching or matching human blood temperature attunes the plant's activ­ity to our biosystem. Many heart remedies such as Crataegus, Strophantus,

and Digi­talis are prepared in the digestio manner; and ferns and willows, used to heal disturbed rhythms of the digestive system, are sub­jected to a digestio process.

2. Infusion. This is similar to brew­ing tea. Dried plants are steeped in simmer­ing water and left for a short time. Brief heating extracts warmth-related substances and is particularly suited to plants which condense the sun's warmth into aromatic oils, such as marjoram, sage, and chamomile flowers.

Through the medium of warmth substances of nature can be directed to the human organism.

3. Boiling or Decoction. Plant parts are started cold and heated to simmering, then boiled for a period of time with the steam from the process cooled and con­densed again and again. This process is re­lated to the cooking of food which does some of the work of digestion. Some plants parts, such as blossom and fruits, already have a strong relationship to warmth. They are, as it were, are precooked by the sun and there­fore can be digested easily without further cooking. Boiling is useful however, in pre­paring other plant parts such as leaves and roots, which are less exposed to the sun's warmth. Roots, live removed from the sun in the cool earth. Relating as they do to the human head and cool nervous system, they can be utilized through the process of de­coction. Chamomile and gentian roots, for example, are often prepared in this way.

4. Distillation. Here a separation is brought about between the volatile sub­stances and their residues through the application of intense heat. An example is Melissengeist, in which warmth and air-re­lated substances are removed from the plant matter. Even solid minerals can be changed by distillation. An example which is freshly distilled phosphorus shows enhanced solu­bility, as though the substance were enliv­ened. Weleda metal preparations are also subjected to the distillation process. These metals, usually bound by gravity, are put into very high temperatures using a com­plex high-vacuum distillation method, which brings them into a gaseous state, then condenses them back onto a cold surface. The metals in this refined state are very delicate and thin, like a mirror, and their prima cosmic nature is reinforced, thus giving then maximum therapeutic effect.

5. Tostatio. has its counter part in cooking, as for example in bread baking or roasting. By cooking with hot air bland foods are aromaticized, digestive glands are stimulated, and metabolic activity increased. One of the best known examples of tostatio is the preparation of green coffee beans whose characteristic aroma and taste are only brought out by roasting.

6. Carbonization of Plants. We ob­serve even stronger warmth effects through combustion in a confined space without oxygen. This forces all fluid and gaseous matter out of the plant, retaining only a car­bon skeleton (carboy. What the earth takes long ages to form as coal deposits is achieved in a short time in the laboratory using warmth. Such plant coal has the remarkable ability to absorb light and gas, making it a valuable remedy in potentized form.

7. Ash (cineres). This is the ultimate application of warmth in pharmacology. With the addition of an air stream, the or­ganic substance is burnt, and all warmth and light, stored during the growth and rip­ening of the plant, is released. What remains is a small heap of ash bearing only the min­eral characteristics of the plant. The greatest liberation of energy in the plant world oc­curs in the blossom and fruiting process which, of course, is followed by a retraction into the seed. Plant ash (cinis) resembles the encapsulated life force of the seed condi­tion. Its capacity to 'remember' the forces of light and warmth, leading to a new be­ginning, has been represented in mythol­ogy in the image of the phoenix rising from the ashes; an ancient symbol of the power of resurrection.

What wonderful effects of warmth we can see before our eyes! Warmth works against earthly stiffness and heaviness. It causes activity to occur in matter and leads to ever higher refining and combining con­ditions, from the solid to the liquid to the gaseous/aeriform; while itself permeating all these states.

Folgendes hat anthroposofische Einschlüße

Frei nach: Markus Sommer, M.D.

R.S.: developed a differentiated range of organ preparations for parenteral use. Before that, animal organs had been used in medicine for thousands of years.

R.S. suggested brain preparations: cerebellum/pineal/lamina quadrigemina [of colliculi]/medulla oblongata/mesencephalon. Later extended to include several hundred organs and parts of organs.

Arrhythmias: 1. Fasciculus atrioventricularis D 8, 2. C or D 8.

One is tempted to ask if such a vast range is really necessary (at a time when there have been demands to sift the range of medicines) and if the organism is really able to make such subtle distinctions between

organs and even subunits of organs. Even sophisticated chemical analysis will not always show differences between the ground substances of different organ preparations.

Research has yielded some impressive answers, e.g. investigation of the causes of NSA (= neuralgic shoulder amyotrophy) a rare condition resulting in pain followed by muscular weakness and atrophy in the region

of the shoulder, thoracic wall and upper arm, generally on one side only. Sierra et al., assuming this to involve autoimmune processes, have done lymphocyte transformation tests, incubating lymphocytes from NSA

patients with extracts (protein concentration in D 6 potency range) of the long thoracic nerve, upper brachial plexus, distal median nerve and sacral plexus from human cadavers.

All lymphocytes responded with marked stimulation to preparations from the long thoracic nerve, those of some patients responded to a lesser degree to the brachial plexus and median nerve preparations, whereas

the sacral plexus only elicited a weak response in exceptional cases. It appeared that a patient's lymphocytes would react with preparations of that patient's nerves which had also undergone pathological changes.

Histologic and chemical analysis would be unlikely to differentiate between those nerves the way even parts of the (morbid) organism appear to be able. Here we have scientific evidence of the "mutual awareness of

organs" described by R.S./Ita Wegeman. Diseases involving changes in immune mechanisms may, in fact, be seen as prototypes in this respect. Allergy, for instance, involves a high degree of antigen specificity, yet

there is no definite dose-effect relationship at the interindividual level. High dilutions of the allergen are used to desensitize patients. In a recently-reported double blind trial with asthma patients using highly

sophisticated methods, D. Reilly et al. showed that the allergen potentized to a level where it can no longer be assumed to be present (C 30) will give significant symptomatic improvement. 

Similarly, organ preparations have highly selective stimulant or depressant effects on homologous organ structures, often giving remarkable results in clinical use. The paper by Sierra et al. shows that immunologic processes are selectively stimulated by homologous nerve tissue. It is evidently also possible to influence the organ concerned with homeopathic potencies of the homologous organ preparation. The action may be depressant if relatively high potencies are used - a case of treating bronchospasm with Plexus pulmonalis D 15 has been reported - or stimulant if low potencies are used. Thus Rudolf Sterner suggested that a patient

with postencephalitic Parkinson's disease should be given potentized midbrain (which contains substantia nigra).

Indirect evidence of the importance of a differentiated range of medicines may be as important for official recognition of the need for a differentiated range of medicines as it is for stimulating our clinical powers of imagination, e.g. to treat NSA with Plexus brachialis.

 

Metallspiegel-Verfahren erzeugt Nanopartikel.

 

Folgendes hat anthroposofische Einschlüße

Frei nach: Dr. Johannes Zwieauer

The ability of warmth to transform substances has been used since primeval times to modify the material world (metal mining/glass blowing/pottery). The ability of warmth to transform substance is also used in the manufacture of remedies; activating processes latent in the substances themselves, which can become healing forces. Through the medium of warmth substances of nature can be directed to the human organism. Anthroposophical medi­cines are almost always made with one or the other of the following warmth processes:

1. Digestio.  a pharma­ceutical process employing mild warmth, specifically the warming of plant juices to blood temperature. In nature plant sub­stances are exposed to seasonal and diurnal temperature rhythms but the pharmacist can maintain constant levels of warmth in the laboratory. The human organism also does this; taking substances out of their ac­customed temperature rhythms and into a constant temperature. Just how vital the maintenance of normal body temperature is becomes clear in that a deviation by just a few degrees from it makes human life dys­functional or impossible. The process of digestio leads to a "humanization" of plant matter. Approaching or matching human blood temperature attunes the plant's activ­ity to our biosystem. Many heart remedies such as Crataegus, Strophantus, and Digi­talis are prepared in the digestio manner; and ferns and willows, used to heal disturbed rhythms of the digestive system, are sub­jected to a digestio process.

2. Infusion. This is similar to brew­ing tea. Dried plants are steeped in simmer­ing water and left for a short time. Brief heating extracts warmth-related substances and is particularly suited to plants which condense the sun's warmth into aromatic oils, such as marjoram, sage, and chamomile flowers.

Through the medium of warmth substances of nature can be directed to the human organism.

3. Boiling or Decoction. Plant parts are started cold and heated to simmering, then boiled for a period of time with the steam from the process cooled and con­densed again and again. This process is re­lated to the cooking of food which does some of the work of digestion. Some plants parts, such as blossom and fruits, already have a strong relationship to warmth. They are, as it were, are precooked by the sun and there­fore can be digested easily without further cooking. Boiling is useful however, in pre­paring other plant parts such as leaves and roots, which are less exposed to the sun's warmth. Roots, live removed from the sun in the cool earth. Relating as they do to the human head and cool nervous system, they can be utilized through the process of de­coction. Chamomile and gentian roots, for example, are often prepared in this way.

4. Distillation. Here a separation is brought about between the volatile sub­stances and their residues through the application of intense heat. An example is Melissengeist, in which warmth and air-re­lated substances are removed from the plant matter. Even solid minerals can be changed by distillation. An example which is freshly distilled phosphorus shows enhanced solu­bility, as though the substance were enliv­ened. Weleda metal preparations are also subjected to the distillation process. These metals, usually bound by gravity, are put into very high temperatures using a com­plex high-vacuum distillation method, which brings them into a gaseous state, then condenses them back onto a cold surface. The metals in this refined state are very delicate and thin, like a mirror, and their prima cosmic nature is reinforced, thus giving then maximum therapeutic effect.

5. Tostatio. has its counter part in cooking, as for example in bread baking or roasting. By cooking with hot air bland foods are aromaticized, digestive glands are stimulated, and metabolic activity increased. One of the best known examples of tostatio is the preparation of green coffee beans whose characteristic aroma and taste are only brought out by roasting.

6. Carbonization of Plants. We ob­serve even stronger warmth effects through combustion in a confined space without oxygen. This forces all fluid and gaseous matter out of the plant, retaining only a car­bon skeleton (carboy. What the earth takes long ages to form as coal deposits is achieved in a short time in the laboratory using warmth. Such plant coal has the remarkable ability to absorb light and gas, making it a valuable remedy in potentized form.

7. Ash (cineres). This is the ultimate application of warmth in pharmacology. With the addition of an air stream, the or­ganic substance is burnt, and all warmth and light, stored during the growth and rip­ening of the plant, is released. What remains is a small heap of ash bearing only the min­eral characteristics of the plant. The greatest liberation of energy in the plant world oc­curs in the blossom and fruiting process which, of course, is followed by a retraction into the seed. Plant ash (cinis) resembles the encapsulated life force of the seed condi­tion. Its capacity to 'remember' the forces of light and warmth, leading to a new be­ginning, has been represented in mythol­ogy in the image of the phoenix rising from the ashes; an ancient symbol of the power of resurrection.

What wonderful effects of warmth we can see before our eyes! Warmth works against earthly stiffness and heaviness. It causes activity to occur in matter and leads to ever higher refining and combining con­ditions, from the solid to the liquid to the gaseous/aeriform; while itself permeating all these states.

 

 

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