Stramonium Kind Anhang

 

Vergleich: Kind with fear in Calc. + Lyc. + Nat-m. + Phos. + Puls. + Sil. + Stram.

 

ADHS

Split between anxiety and aggression

 

[Dr. M.A. Rajalakshmi]

Plethoric. Desires light and company. Cannot bear to be alone. <: dark/solitude; Cannot walk in a dark room. Obsession with switching lights on and off.

[Paul Herscu]

Sleep

...at that more truthful hour when my eyes closed to the things of the outer world (on whose frontier intellect and will, momentarily paralyzed, could no longer strive to rescue me from the cruelty of my real impressions) reflected, refracted the agonizing annihilation, in the mysteriously lighted darkness of my organs. World of sleep in which our inner consciousness placed in bondage to the disturbances of our organs, quickens the rhythm of heart and breath because a similar dose of terror, sorrow, remorse, acts with a strength magnified a hundredfold if it is thus injected into our veins; as soon as, to traverse the arteries of the subterranean city, we have embarked upon an inward

Lethe meandering sixfold, huge solemn forms appear to us, approach, and glide away, leaving us in tears.

Proust, from Sodomme et Gomorrhe 22-224

Along with the mental-emotional realm and the nervous system, the realm of sleep offers the most insight into the Stramonium cycle. In fact this area is so rich in confirmatory symptoms that if you have a child with absolutely no sleep symptoms to verify a prescription of Stramonium, it is unlikely to be the correct remedy.

That there are so many sleep symptoms is not surprising, for it is during sleep and in the process of drifting off to sleep, that the conscious mind finally relinquishes control and the unconscious mind takes over. It is here, in the night, that everything held in check during the day will finally be expressed. The intense battle-line between conscious and unconscious, so carefully drawn throughout the day, shifts during the night, as one side loses its ability to fight and the other gains in power. As the images of death

increase, the segments having to do with stillness, with death, grow stronger, and this serves to intensify the segment of fear in the child.

This battle can be witnessed in three different areas. The presence of symptoms in any one of these areas can be used to confirm the need for Stramonium:

• Fears before Sleep

• Nightmares and Night Terrors

• General Sleep Symptoms

Each of these categories will be presented separately, but first I would like to draw the reader's attention to a valuable book for understanding children's sleep, Richard Ferber's Solve Your Child's Sleep Problems, published by Simon and Schuster. This book is most helpful in developing a fuller understanding of sleep cycles and sleep disturbances. I strongly recommend chapters one, four, and five for parents and clinicians alike.

Fears Before Sleep

Fear of going to bed is a fairly characteristic symptom found in most Stramonium children. Many young children will be unable to voice specific reasons for their fears, but older children will commonly admit to: fear of the dark, of monsters, of being left alone, and such fears as are often associated with movies and stories recently seen or heard.

A more common cause for bedtime fears, whether the child verbalizes it or not, is a previous history of terrifying dreams. It is the terror of repeating such dreams that makes

a Stramonium child fear of going to sleep. One gets the feeling that there is a battle raging within the child between a dark demonic side and the forces of light. Each night, there surfaces within the child an overwhelming sense that, at some deep level, he is about to go through those same horrible visions—visions of torture, of terror.

And so, each night, he resists his parents' attempts to put him to bed, and even more desperately resists falling asleep.

Many authorities on sleep disorders believe that nighttime fears are brought about by some stress or anxiety that has occurred during the day but only surfaces at night. The stresses may be external

in origin, such as fear of being separated from the mother or the kind of fears that often accompany a divorce. There may also exist a justifiable fear of being beaten or violated in some way, which can develop after the child has been abused. Even one beating can bring on such fear.

Stresses may also be internal in origin. At the time when the child is developing impulse control, when he wants to misbehave, his impulsive side may begin to struggle with and fight against his controlling side. Most children ultimately work this out, but the Stramonium child does not. In observing the child's attempts to establish control over impulses, the parent or practitioner will witness the following sequence unfolding in an introverted Stramonium child: first, he feels a strong impulse to misbehave (the violent overreaction segment), then guilt over this impulse mounts (the closing off/introversion segment), so he struggles to control it, which makes him hypervigilant and anxious about relinquishing control (the shut down/dead segment). No wonder he becomes increasingly

more fearful of going to bed and has so much trouble falling asleep. He worries and worries, although quite unable to pinpoint why he is worried in the first place. In truth, he is worrying about his own impulses. The darkness or monsters that these children fear are nothing more than their own impulses buried deep in the unconscious. The horrible nightmares and night terrors spring out from these buried impulses. Herman Melville expressed this well in Pierre, "One trembles to think of that mysterious thing in the soul, which seems to acknowledge no human jurisdiction, but in spite of

the individual's own innocent self, will still dream horrid dreams and mutter unmentionable thoughts."

In the Stramonium child you are likely to see certain typical behaviors at bedtime. Many of these, in one way or another, exemplify the rubric:

MIND: Clinging. During the preverbal stage, from 8 - 15 months, the child may scream when being put to bed. No matter how hard a mother may try to ensure a smooth, love-filled transition from the waking state into the sleep state, the outcome is more likely to be such loud shrieking that it renders her temporarily deaf. Despite continued attempts on her part to soothe the child, he will shut his eyes tight and scream at the top of his lungs. This bedtime shrieking often resembles that of Med., Tub., Lyc., Cham., Borx, Cina or Calcarea phosphorica,

All the mother's warm, soothing words and the loving tone of voice do not penetrate through whatever horrible thing it is that envelops the child at that time.

So every night a push/pull scenario takes place. When picked up, the little one will struggle and resist and pull away, which only exasperates the parent. At the very same time he may be asking

to sleep in the parents' bed, where he sleeps best, (actually in contact with the parent). Sometimes he will be content if the parent lies down with him in his bed, but as he drifts off, as soon as the parent attempts to rise quietly and tiptoe away, the child will startle, half-awake, and begin to cry anew.

An older child will be more likely to express his fear of going to sleep by acting out or by strongly resisting any request made throughout the evening that even hints of bedtime. A simple suggestion such as, "Time to brush your teeth," will set the child off like a time-bomb. The parents begin to wonder if their child is crazy The therapist may describe him as irrational, impulsive, or oppositional. Yet, in reality, the child is scared witless but lacks the verbal maturity required to express it. Often the parent, failing to realize what's behind this irritating and confusing behavior, tries to force the child to go to sleep. But because he is unable to express what is bothering him, he resists, and a major conflict follows. These bedtime wars only further disrupt the already shaky parent/child relationship.

Unfortunately, the battle waged between parent and child over the terrain of the Stramonium's psyche never engages the real enemy (the fear, the isolation, the confusion). Moreover, the conflict

only seems to deepen the child's pain, causing a further expansion of the breach in the containment of his unconscious, which results in his spiralling even deeper within the same cycle.

The Stramonium child experiences these injunctions and actions (such as forcing him to go to bed) as attempts to alienate or isolate him.

Even worse, he feels abandoned to his fate—a night full of hideous visions.

To deal with these fears, the child may develop an almost opposite strategy to the time-bomb behavior, a strategy of over-control.

He may begin to act rigidly, even exhibit ritualistic behaviors.

One parent described her daughter's bedtime ritual. "She insists that I read the same book every night. Then I have to rub her back clockwise for a while, then counterclockwise. Then she turns,

sighs, and says, 'Go,' dismissing me with a word, as if my services are no longer required."

If the child is older, he may be able to articulate his nighttime fears, citing specific events from the past that frightened him. Some children report frights from experiences such as being attacked

by a person or an animal. They become increasingly upset by the possibility of this fright recurring as night closes in. Most commonly in contemporary North America.

 

ADHS:

Stramonium. D12 Glob. (var. manufacturers), 5 glob. 1 – 2x daily.

The doctor’s first meeting with the child provides a characteristic indication for this remedy:

Leading symptoms:

• child generally displays adapted behavior in the consultation room, but avoids eye contact or a direct meeting; shies away out of apparent uncertainty and anxiety; may stutter; acute illnesses may take an intense course leading to spasms of the respiratory tract.

• in the home, anxiety is also noticed by the parents at bedtime (need for light when falling asleep, fear of being alone)

• this is paired with sudden, unmediated aggressivity that may be quite intense (Bell.), but the child is less aware of it—

the adapted side knows nothing of the uncontrolled, aggressive side, resulting in a Dr. Jekill-and-Mr.-Hyde type of split:

the nerve-sense and metabolic-limb systems become dissociated

• attention is more obviously impaired than in Belladonna

In this difficult situation, Stramonium is a potent remedy that is effective in complementary therapy of ADHD. Regarding the use of Hyoscyamus in ADHD, the authors use it essentially as a component of the composite remedy Aurum/Stibium/Hyoscyamus described above; as a single remedy (Rh D6 Dil w) it is important in treating forms of epilepsy associated with ADHS-type symptoms.

 

[Tim Shannon]

The following is an edited transcript from a patient who presented with post traumatic stress disorder. Post traumatic syndrome disorder (PTSD) is explicit in this case, however it can also present

in a more insidious fashion. The main themes I’ve observed to help me consider PTSD as the primary diagnosis are:

1. Escape:

    a. Unconsciousness, Numbness, Floating, Disassociation, Painlessness, Restlessness/Occupation

2. Hyper vigilance:

    a. Someone is in the house, behind me, or lurking

    b. Hypersensitivity – noises, touch, smells, etc.

    c. Mistrust and suspiciousness (especially if harm was perpetrated by people rather than natural disasters, accidents, etc.)

    d. Insomnia

3. Hyper-defensiveness:

    a. Rage & outbursts, pushing others away, promiscuity, OCD (controlling environment as defense)

4. Stuck in the past:

    a. Flashbacks, repeating nightmares or dreams, brooding on past, dejavu.

The patient was 35 at the initial intake. He was referred by his adopted mother, a therapist, who came to a local talk I’d done on PTSD. He is African American, thin and well built. The patient had been frequently moved around from foster home to foster home as a young boy. At one of those homes in particular, he was frequently abused in a variety of ways. Finally he was adopted by a wonderful family.

He was mild mannered and soft spoken. He paused frequently, sometimes for long moments. He would often look like he was struggling to form thoughts at times, often putting his hand to his forehead as if working hard to come up with thoughts. In addition, throughout treatment, especially in the beginning, he often would struggle with basic concepts. His presentation is somewhat scattered. I found it necessary at times to focus him with a variety of prompts.

 

Consultation of Monday, December 27, 2004

What can you tell me?      [Long pause and then he asks me where to start].

What brings you here?      "My mom went to one of your seminars. She thought you could help with some of the feelings I’m having. [Pause while he reflects]. It just makes me think, no I don't really have any problems or things I can’t solve. All the things I've been through, being adopted, moving to a small town, racism, and my reading disability. To sum it up have great parents .. I don’t' know where to go... Sometimes I have the blues, when stressed I bite my nails more then I should - never been able to stop. Usually when I get really really stressed, lower back hurts, now moved into my neck. Severe headaches in the past mostly. Out of everything, this emptiness inside is pretty much it - difficult to be in this situation."

More?      "I've coped extremely well. Out of all the things I've been through, came through pretty good. Had good parents, good community.

Difficult times?      "What is sitting heavy on my mind is the last relationship I went through. With someone I thought was a sound person. But going through the yelling part. In our family, our dad was a yeller, but typical family life, keep everyone in line. But this x-girlfriend, she was a yeller, agitating a person to do something, and always blaming everyone else. Making me feel bad and I was always getting sucked in. She was a heavy drinker, smoked a lot of weed. I did too, but more to fit in. My friends are a bunch of heavy drinkers. For some dumb reason I’m still trying to process that whole relationship. She had a little boy, I cared about him - still do… Again me trying to process why everything went the way it did, that I cared about her.

Being moved around from home to home, with adoption as a kid. Moved from one foster home to another, which was getting the crap kicked out of me, jabbed at with needles, forced to eat food I didn't want to eat. You know - heavy abuse. But going back to her, being sexually abused in my foster homes, to seeing where I am right now, and why can't I make it. Everything bounces off of the last relationship that I had. She said I wasn't there, which I don’t get, I could have sworn I was.

I really hate to say this. But my piece of mind would be about finding someone else. Most of my stuff is just feelings, and it is the blues. Maybe that is a form of depression. For the last 3 months, been getting worse. If sit down and watch some TV, not thinking about me. There is just a side of me missing.

Then think about before adoption and the abuse and trying to figure out where to go. Trying to keep busy so not thinking as much, tire myself out so not thinking as much. Trying to go with the flow. People ask me to go some place, so I go, can only watch so much TV. Usually that is what I do, come home, plop down in front of TV, instead of socializing. "

What do you do for a living?      "I work for an independent contractor doing installation and maintenance. Recently the Xmas or holiday blues. Found myself really struggling trying to read my work orders. My memory has definitely faded. I'll know I'm in a bind, if feel myself angry for no apparent reason. This morning was a bad one. Got really angry, hopped in the car, popped in some gospel music, which didn't calm me down. "

Are you restless?      "Like I got to do something, got to be moving. Friends are always saying I'm never sitting still, always moving. Stay too long in one place… I don’t' know I just like to move.

Sitting around makes me think. All my thoughts go back to my past history. They are not pleasant thoughts, thoughts of poor me. Why was I treated this way. Why can't I read like everyone else. Why does my reading come in strong on some days, and not on others. Vision comes in and out; some days really straining. Then going back to a foster home, and being jabbed with needles whenever I got a word wrong. I was jabbed with a huge sewing needle. I have to limit myself being around my own kind, they set things off inside - it just burns me. Have to keep my mouth shut, so just sit back or I’ll overreact. I do a lot of talking to myself, god this is just not right. Everything I see, always has to go back to before I was adopted. "

I prompt him to tell me more about his past abuse if he is comfortable?      "I'd like to go back if I could. Don’t know if you've seen Antoine Fisher. That movie is always on, always watch it no matter where it is at, wherever it is playing. I have real brothers and sisters out there. Sometimes I have a desire to find them. Or to go back to people who've wronged me and to set them straight. Would that give me some closure - probably. The dude who used to put me in a box and push me down the stairs, or chase me with knives or beat on me with bats. If I could just go back in time and whoop his ass. Reflecting, if I could shut this reflecting off that would be cool. At one house, boys on one side and girls on the other. Things weren't fun, the fights the beatings. I went back when in Junior High, it was alright. Nice to go back, but don’t' think it would solve anything. This anxiety though, nice to know what that is about. "

Anxiety?      "I'll be sitting down, and then have to get up. Then why do I get up, what am I doing. My concentration is totally shot, I get up to do something, then think, what am I doing, what did I get up to do. I think everything needs to be done all at once. "

Headaches? "Most of them are in the front of my head. On a day like this (sunny day) usually have to wear sunglasses. Again any time start to think of past things, get that look on my face of concentration. Then it would sit right here (points to vertex), and then radiate. Used to be really bad, but chiropractor helped a lot. "

Bad?      "Didn't want to open my eyes. Also these ear muffs, if could block sound, it wasn't as severe. Got these red ear muffs on, like used for heavy machinery, and sunglasses and hat. Would get pounding headaches, sometimes went right into the nervous system.

Always get a pain on my arm, it was like a bruise. Just to have a shirt to touch it, would hurt, it would move around, sometimes on this arm, or the other arm. It would move around, really weird. "

During headaches?      "Yes. I'd try to grin and bear it, then sit yourself down in front of the TV, wearing sunglasses while watching. It was the top part of the head. "

Anything else around the headache?      "No, headaches and sore muscles. "

I wonder if you have any fears or phobias?      "The dark, fears of the dark. Always being locked in closets. Imagine yourself being shoved into a box, and then closed on you, and down 12 flights of stairs. Oh! if I could see him now! Or tight places, can't go on rides with pressure on my chest, or anything tight on my chest - I'll flip out. Being pinned down.

Which was another one of those things. Being adopted, some foster homes are good, but a lot are just.... just not right. It is funny, the social workers would always ask, how are you doing. You know you have the foster parent right around the corner, always wanted to say something but then knew if I did, would be in more trouble. Didn’t want to be moved from home to home.

I Can't go in any rides, or small areas. If do, really have to concentrate really hard. Which really sucks, because a lot of neat rides I'd like to go on, but seeing a 35 year old man flipping out. I just avoid them, and say just not feeling well, instead of telling the truth - scared shitless. "

Other fears?      "Heights was another one. Yeah, it is so funny. Everything leads up to this one house, this dude used to pick me up and dangle me above these stairs. Every now and then he'd drop me. So heights, small areas, the dark. The small areas was being shoved into a dryer, and having it turned on. You can see why I don’t' want to think.

Now after talking about it today, have to watch it, because will overreact. Any little thing I see, that someone is doing to a small person. Heights, small places, dark, being pushed down, someone restricting me. Having to eat something I really don't want to. Oh yeah! It used to be water. Used to be fear of water til I learned how to swim. Used to be extremely nervous around water, but thanks to a good teacher, not a phobia of mine anymore. "

Most of the fears related to abuse?      "yes, again this one family. Supposed to be given a bath, she couldn't do it, and foster brother would do it. Haven't even told my counselor about all of this, it is in the back of my head. Fear or phobia that aren't related to the abuse? all of mine go back to being in the foster homes.

Other than that, like to think of myself as a pretty good well rounded person. "

Animals?      "Spiders, centipedes, not to keen on worms or snakes. That’s not connected to abuses; cockroaches, the little white ones that look like rice. Should say bees, too. Always been fascinated with bees, but for some reason get stung when fascinated with them. Something that small can make a person run for his life. "

Any hypersensitivities?      "Being forced to eat peas, or spinach, or meatloaf, still can't stand meatloaf. Any time I come through an apt building a certain smell hits me, that anxiety hits me.

Peas and beans and spinach for some reason. I'm thinking something, and it flies out of my mouth. I’ll say oh, “I’m not eating that!”, then think to myself, oops I said that out loud. Then try to cover it up. To be polite honestly, peas I have a tough time with, but spinach and cabbage, will stomach them. But peas just can't. The other one blurting out of my mouth. "

Any Nervous habits?       “nail biting. Having to just get up and moving around. The nail biting has gotten really bad, tried hot sauce on my hands, smashing peas on them. "

Hot/Cold Body part?      “I used to have problems with circulation. Fingers from forearms on down, would go ice cold. It would happen specifically when playing in a basketball game. I couldn't get them warm. As soon as I stopped, as soon as stopped playing, then they'd go to sweating as the rest of me was cooling down. "

Numbness or tingling sensations?      “Every now and then, your hands or feet would go to sleep. It was either one or the other. "

Pain threshold?      “Normal range, except if you come to me with a needle. still a huge fear of needles and whoever has it, whoever is holding one. More jumpy around needles than knives. "

Physical health complaints?      “With the last girlfriend, I had sexual problems for 6 months in the middle. Scared the shit out of me actually. "

Problem?      “Erectile problem. "

Urinary?       “bladder infections, had maybe 4 of those. "

Recall?      “I've had only 2 girlfriends since High School, had 2 with Tammy, just typical bladder infections, extremely painful. Blood and all that.

This last relationship was really stressful, going through the abuse, and arguing. Being thrown in jail, being hit by her, getting herpes from her, to getting into a fight with her Dad. Then I said, enough, I've got to leave. I've done pretty well.

Who are you aside from all that? That is a really good question. I had a friend who asked me, who I was. And I don’t know. I've always seen myself with someone. Friends, along with mom and dad, say you need to find yourself. What does that mean. I love the forest, wanted to be a park ranger, getting out of the city. I know what I like to do. I like to hike, going to the falls. Hiking and camping, love to do all that stuff. Every year I go rafting, that water has a lot of force, scares the crap out of me. It is one that I've really been able to overcome, really proud of it. "

Thirst?      “Will go through the day without drinking. Sometimes go 2 months drinking a lot of water, then the next 2 months I'll struggle with it. "

Lower back?       “when in High School, had a severe accident. The car that struck us, I was sleeping near the door, wonder why I'm still alive. So anytime I get stressed out, it would go to my back. Now it is my neck. If holding my head up and stressed it would go into my neck, and then rolling into the shoulders. "

Describe?      “Like a nerve is between a bone, and getting rubbed over. A dull but sharp pain. "

Sleep?      “I lay down, tired fall asleep. Go to bed 11 or 12ish. Sleep 2 hours, then wake up, or sleep for 4 hours. Longest I’ve gone is 5 and a half. Then up and wide awake. In the last 5 months, really started dreaming heavily. But can't make out what they are about. Used to have dejavu feelings all the time. dejavu, - like I've been here. Friends say, no you haven’t. I'd be describing things as if I’d been there before, it was scary. "

Recall any Dreams?      “I'm walking in these woods, coming out from behind two trees . There is this voice that is calling, want to turn around, but for some reason don't. Then like about to slip into another dream and another one, but trying to wake myself up, but feel myself slipping more and more. There is pitch black on one half, and on the other half, trees and the house where I grew up. On the other side, our child hood home, where the garden was, it’s totally black. Can' t make out the voice. I'm heading towards the dark, but felt like someway loosing myself. Then thought should head back. Then woke up, panic and sweating, heart racing out of my chest. I used to get that dream all the time, or a face that was always chasing me. It happened after being adopted. It was the same dream. I thought I'd tried to fight it, and as soon as I matched the face, that stopped the dream. It was the face of someone that was always abusing me. Now they are not as deep and as serious, used to have them up until High School, seeing a counselor then.

Anger expression?      There is a side that wants to react, and the other side that doesn't. Always been picked at, poked at. Not so much is physical. Even with the stuff with last relationship, physical on her end. it was starting to get physical on my end. It is a big huge rage that is building up. I'm not kidding, I said I'm not taking any more abuse from you, your brother, or your father. There is definitely a rage in me. I have anger and frustration, why am I in this situation. I don't want this feeling. "

Does something trigger anger at times?      “Change is one of those things that can bring it out. The anger slips out. Change makes me mad, when there is change, and I don’t feel there needs to be. Change sets me off. "

More?      “maybe change is the wrong word. "

Confrontation?      “There is a side of me that wants to, and the other that wants to let it go. "

Opposites?      “there is a right way and a wrong way. Whenever I'm doing it the right way, why am I always getting hurt. I'm getting stepped on, now is my time to react.

Now the one that just burns me, you have to be the bigger man and let it go. "

Do you feel contained?      “Yes. "

Your anger?      “it doesn't show up. I get there. Where it shows up is me going off by myself and just crying. For it to come out, it’s like I’d end up loosing myself. When I was in jail, everyone thought I'd lost it. My x-girlfriend had told people that I'd done all this violence to her. Those were things I'm not capable of - I did a week of crying. "

Violent?      “I lost it dead in the jaw by her father. Wouldn't let him get the best of me. He'd said I had to leave. It took me back to before I was adopted.

I decided to go back and say good bye. Then within a few minutes he was coming up behind me. I turn around, then every swear word came out of my mouth. I turned back around, then he hit in me in the jaw, and again. For a split second, as soon as I'd reacted, trying not to react. Then realized that now you'd done it. So grabbed him in a bear hug, and we hit the ground.

Then her relatives came out, and a free for all on my back. I don’t' remember feeling any blows. I just knew I wasn't going to go out like this. Rolled around on the ground with him, knew I was going to get a beating. Then when they realized I wasn't doing anything, they let me be, then released. Then I'm starting to cry, looking up to her grandmother, she'd been so nice to me. Then out of the blue, hit twice more by her dad. That is the only time I'd reacted. It is there, just as of this point, there is self control. "

Do you have an overactive imagination?       “Yes, happens when not concentrating on my driving. yes, I tend to go over my life, over and over and over. It drives me up the wall. No matter what I'm doing, constantly replaying everything in my life. It just pisses me off. Gets to a point where unable to function. I have dyslexia. Sometimes driving and find myself on the wrong road. It is almost like a black out. That happens occasionally. "

Other examples?       “One of the other incidents at work, I was supposed to be doing an installation out of town, and would find myself half way to the wrong city. Or forgetting to pick things up. The driving ones are the main ones, where supposed to be somewhere but end up somewhere else. My concentration is just not there. "

 

Mother (calls on the phone to contribute): He had a lot of anger as a youth. My husband used to say it was alike a helium balloon, you had to pull the string down. He’d numb out, like he was floating someplace else. Like he'd be in a conversation, he'd get up and be gone, no good bye. He was out of his seat, extremely hyper in school too. In a 20 minute period out of his seat 11 times. Bedwetting from at least 7th grade till Junior High or 8th grade.

 

Baseline Symptoms:

1 Lack of Concentration - pretty much all day, reading work orders

2 Dwelling on the past - Daily affair

3 Headaches - 4 - 6 headaches in a month

4 Blues - sad, want to go and cry - that is almost daily

5 Phobias - claustrophobia in the back seat

6 Anger - once a week outburst

7 Isolating - avoid friends - daily 8 TV - Daily affair

9 Physical Restlessness

10 Nail biting - daily

 

Assessment: During the intake I began to suspect a nightshade was indicated. Many themes common in the solanum genus were present. I’d seen several nightshade cases in practice previously.

In addition, I attended a one week course on nightshades and their look a likes with Massimo Mangialavori in October of 2005. Massimo’s differential of nightshades really help me to more fully understand the entire family as well as other Rx’s that are outside of the nightshade botanical family entirely.

In particular, the two long term cases he showed of Tanacetum vulgare were virtually indistinguishable with nightshades. In addition, I also learned to understand the differential between

Bell. Stram. Hyos. and Mand. in clinical practice. He also covered Solanum nigrum, and some nightshade look-alikes such as Lyss. Gall-ac.

 

Datura Stramonium – The Nightshade for this case:

I thought this case required Stramonium. My rationale is that he very explicitly talked about being divided, something more common with Stramonium. My experience with Stram shows them to be also a bit more sympathetic than some of the other nightshades. In addition, in adults, they are often more scattered than Belladonna. Belladonna patients in adults are often successful business people or someone who presents as having it together more. They are more forceful or adamant at controlling their dark-side. Hyos usually presents as being more haughty and sure of themselve. In addition, Hyos often presents as almost proud of their dark side. Mandragora is closer to Stram in my experience, so I’m not as sure about how to differentiate the two. However, Mandragora seems less clearly divided or scattered than Stram in my experience. In addition, in both of my Mandragora cases, the craving for cheese was marked. For readers who are helped by repertory, here is my MacRepertory graph:

 

 

The patient received two dry doses of Stramonium 1M (Boiron) on 12/29/04

 

 

Consultation of Monday, January 24, 2005

 

How are you doing?       “The sleep was better. Still 4 hours of sleep, but now sleeping harder, waking feel more refreshed. Thinking things, going over old stuff, has disappeared. I'm not dwelling on it anymore. The nail biting, nervousness is all still the same. "

 

 

Baseline Symptoms:

1 Lack of Concentration - pretty much all day, reading work orders

      "Unchanged."

2 Dwelling on the past - Daily affair

     " Stopped"

3 Headaches - 4 - 6 headaches in a month

      "No Headaches this month"

4 Blues - sad, want to go and cry - that is almost daily

      "That is not there anymore."

5 Phobias - claustrophobia in the back seat

     " Deferred"

6 Anger - once a week outburst

      "Hard to say"

7 Isolating - avoid friends - daily 8 TV - Daily affair

      "That is the same, no change, though I haven't been watching a lot of TV. Not within the last 5 days"

9 Physical Restlessness

      "It seems like it has subsided, it is still there but not as strong."

10 Nail biting - daily:

      "No change. After I took the Rx, did a week without biting, though that can happen."

 

Feeling anything around the dosing itself?       “After I took it, felt a little perky, could take on the world, felt real good. It lasted for awhile, just started dropping off last week. "

More?       “That anxiety thing is kind of coming back, a restlessness. "

Dreams?       “No. "

 

 

Assessment: Overall – good progress. The brooding, headaches, sleep etc. are better. What is interesting is the blankness the patient presented with today. He seemed to really be struggling internally with various questions, or with comprehension. Given that he was still having difficulty with concentration, and that he suffers from long standing PTSD, I thought it best to give him some additional supportive doses. So a 200c in a once ounce bottle once a week was prescribed. I also gave him some instruction to take doses for acutes in the interim as needed, but he seemed to have some difficulty in understanding my instructions in general.

 

 

Plan:      Stram 200c (Boiron – a few pellets dissolved in a 1 oz dropper bottle) – 4 drops once a week.

 

 

Consultation of Monday, March 21, 2005

Now?       “Concentration is definitely right on point. Definitely more on focus. Just got over a cold, which has been lingering for the past month. For a couple of weeks forgot to take the Rx, but definitely concentration is on point. Anxiety is not bad, it is really not bad, much better than it was. Nervousness it not there anymore, not as much. I'm not replaying anything in my mind anymore. Just everything that is in front of me, dealing with that."

Taking the Rx?       “Daily , took it, daily.

During the cold, I had anxiety so bad, the bedroom I was in, it wasn’t big enough. I got .. started getting claustrophobia, that was about 3 weeks ago. It was so bad, couldn’t be in the room. Was pacing around in the house, then couldn’t be in a bigger room, and then couldn't be in the house. I was sick, and weak, cold, and had to go outside in the cold. Was outside all night pacing the entire night. I'd come back in, sleep a bit, and then back outside, walking around. That might have been the reason why I stopped the dosing. My mother told me to call you and ask about this – but I didn’t. Light, noise everything was bothering me." (Patient had been taking the 200c daily for several weeks by mistake – a misunderstanding. About a month into dosing he had a strong cold that lasted for several weeks. During the cold, he had a sort of crisis of claustrophobia, anxiety, and hypersensitivity. I believe this was due to his overdosing. However this aggressive dosing also appeared to resolve his concentration problems markedly. After the cold, he also spontaneously discontinued the Rx.)

 

 

Baseline Symptoms:

1 Lack of Concentration - pretty much all day, reading work orders

      "Clearly better "

2 Dwelling on the past - Daily affair

      "That is done, not anymore"

3 Headaches - 4 - 6 headaches in a month

      "They are gone, other then when the cold came."

4 Blues - sad, want to go and cry - that is almost daily

      "I've slipped back into that. Just noticed that within the last 3 weeks, but still coming off of the cold, it was a pretty strong cold. Went through my muscles, and my nervous system. Yesterday was a tough day b/c of the blues. Just this sad feelings. Anything else about that? No, that is it."

5 Phobias - claustrophobia in the back seat

      "Saturday night, went out with some friends. Was in the back seat of my truck, and didn't notice anything. I was in the middle, s/t I wouldn't do. Now sitting in vehicles, and it seems to not be so there."

6 Anger - once a week outburst

      "Oh, that is better. My boss said Trimet was about to do s/t that makes no sense. And I blew it off. Felt self getting to a point, and then it just released. I could say honestly before I would have been just really mad. It is better, would have been really mad. There was also another demonstration of where I’d normally get very angry, and didn’t, just let go. That does seem better. "

7 Isolating - avoid friends - daily 8 TV - Daily affair

      "It is getting better. It is still there, but I believe it is getting better"

9 Physical Restlessness

      "It feels like it is not there anymore - it is definitely not there. Which has me concerned. Concerned? yes, if do happen to relax too much, may go back to sitting in front of the TV, rather be out moving around. Still can't go to church by myself. Still can't go food shopping by myself. Improvement in shopping? No. It is like not feeling like going to church. And grocery shopping, I just don't want to do it. "

10 Nail biting - daily:

      "A: Continued progress. It appears as if Strammonium is the accurate Rx here. His initial progress was good, yet the concentration was not improving. Now that is clearly improving, and the other initial improvements have been retained. To further his healing progress, I gave him a few doses of 1M and a follow-up date of about 2 months. I expect he will notice further progress again by that point."

 

 

Plan:      1.) Stram 1M dry – one dose a day for 2 days

     2.) Return to clinic in 2 months for follow-up

 

 

Consultation of Wednesday, May 18, 2005

How are you doing?       "I'm doing well. I've had a friend that moved back from Chicago. Been talking a lot with her, started to go in reverse, started to feel the blues, depression was setting in, but lasted for 3 days. After I realized what was happening in my mind I was okay. I consider that a huge improvement. "

Huge improvement?       "I would have expected to dwell on it and run it through on my mind. When it starts to rain, that is also when the blues set in. Been buzzing right along, friends ask where do you get all this energy from. Anything else from when you first came in. Still biting my nails, that is deep down, don't know about that one. My stress levels have been really low. Had another incident where would have dwelt on something in my volunteer work with kids and didn’t. "

 

 

Baseline Symptoms:

3 Headaches - 4 - 6 headaches in a month

      "They have started up again. In the middle of last month, they started up. Prior to that, not having any, or maybe one or two. Now it is more like 4 times per week. Been a long week, a fender bender last week, and this thing that happened with my coaching. Saw a person have a heart attack at a wedding, really freaked me out. Also saw someone have an asthma attack. These are normal things that would really set me off, but they haven't. Another stress would be, taking on more of a coaching role, have stepped up."

4 Blues - sad, want to go and cry - that is almost daily

      "Other than me stepping on head coaches toes, it has only happened once in the last 2 months. "

5 Phobias - claustrophobia in the back seat

      "That is completely gone, been doing a lot of sitting in back seats, really interesting."

6 Anger - once a week outburst

      "I still feel that building up from frustration - really wanting to lash out. It is pretty strong, Frequency? I don't think it is there as much. There is a difference."

7 Isolating - avoid friends - daily

      "That one snuck up on me. I have friends, not necessarily the world's greatest friends. But been going over to friends houses. Isolating not so frequent now? Yes, not at all, but still a pull there."

10 Nail biting - daily

      "No change."

 

 

A: Good response all around. Yet his headaches are recurring somewhat and there is still some stagnation in some symptoms. So I suggested a single dose of the 1M he has at home.

 

 

Consultation of Monday, July 18, 2005

How are you doing?       "Everything was going real great, until last month. E/t has kind of worn off. Back to getting four hours of sleep. The sleep part is getting bad again. I felt depressed, that was about 3 weeks, now coming out of that. Focus hasn't been too bad, but for awhile there it was kind of. Now everything .. the sleep is not there, it is 4 hours. The nails, I'm still biting the nails. Old memories are coming up. It was bad where if thought about it would have started crying, but kept myself busy. Still hanging out with friends instead of staying by myself. It felt like a little depression, sleep, nail biting. This would be the time where I separated from my girlfriend – 2 years ago. Three weeks ago would be right around when it happened. "

Difficult break for you?       "yes. "

Up until 3 weeks ago, doing okay?       "Yes, doing fine. "

Sleep?       "It is waking up, then unable to go back to sleep, til the time I'm supposed to be getting up. "

Does the anger seem excessive to you?       "I am speaking more to our contractor, so that is a good sign. "

Standing up for yourself?       "Yes, actually do feel that way, not being passive. "

Any other complaints?       "No. "

Your sense of the treatment?       "It has been real good, feels like this tug of war inside of me, not being quite used to.. Sleep was cool when I was getting it. Not being passive but speaking up. I've got nothing but positive things to say about it. "

A: Sounds like anniversary of old Relationship breakup may have relapsed the patient. I recommended he take a stiff daily dose of 1M to see if that would get his sleep and other symptoms back on track.

 

 

Plan:      Stramonium; daily from bottle (a few pellets in 1 oz bottle) 4 drops under the tongue once a day for 7 days – than discontinue.

 

 

Consultation of Tuesday, September 06, 2005

How did that week’s worth of dosing work?       "It helped with the sleeping. "

Doing?       "Pretty good. "

Any concerns?       "No, though still biting the nails. The irritability has gone done, not as intense as before. I haven't really had anxiety. Things that were done to you in the past, how do you feel? If I saw them today, I'd kick the shit out of them, anger. Not going to let you get away with this. That is pretty much it. "

How are things in relationships?       "Still don't have a girlfriend, going on 3 years - not seeing anyone. I was going to dance clubs fairly regularly, and then just stopped. I would go out but not so interested.

Family life, it is tough for me to hang out with my family, everyone is married. My brother had a child, and I couldn't get myself to hold it. Afterwards I come home to my own place, and start to feel sorry for myself, my brother has it together and I don't. So avoid getting together with the family. That has been a problem throughout. But when I do go, do enjoy the time with everyone. But often after leaving whatever function it was, I'm not happy about where I am, I'm emotional, but no tears, no crying. I'm sure they are all trying to figure out why I didn't want to hold the baby. "

You have an idea why?       "No."

 

 

Baseline Symptoms:

1 Lack of Concentration - pretty much all day, reading work orders

     " It is fine now, it really is."

2 Dwelling on the past - Daily affair

      "Still happening. "Still everyday? "It is just for a second. Just that thought pops in my head, then it is gone. "Feels different/same? "It is different, now it is like a blip. Maybe dwell on it for maybe 5 minutes, then it is gone, out of my head. "Before? "It was all day, dwelling on the same thing, or a group of things."

3 Headaches - 4 - 6 headaches in a month

      No headaches

4 Blues - sad, want to go and cry - that is almost daily

      "Emotional state after watching the Katrina floods. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. That was a really emotional thing, really hard to look at, for 35 minutes was in tears talking with my mom and other friends. It really hit home with me, made me really emotional. "Something in particular? "Head officials said they have it under control, and then seeing everything unfold the way it did. Babies being in the street dying with people - people being displaced. Took 5 days for things to get moving, and being unable to go down and help. It really upset me, still does. I cried for 35 minutes, then after that was on to other things. The stuff you've given me helped so I could move on."

5 Phobias - claustrophobia in the back seat

      "We went to the Oregon Caves. They had 16 of us all together. I told them I didn't know if I could handle it, so watch me. You get that cold air that hit me, I was the last one in. It was tight, really really tight. The ranger shut this big gate behind me, it was getting worse, I was pulling on my collar, plus it was dark. Everybody was bumping up against each other. Then I began to back out. After about 15 minutes had calmed down pretty quickly. I would have to have gotten out, I was pretty happy. "Difference? "Yes, I was able to get it together, took some breaths. "Enjoy it? "Yes, really did. Wasn't the other thing heights, I walked up this 150 foot ladder. Coming down was difficult, had to focus on the ladder. But really happy with the heights though, not as bad."

6 Anger - once a week outburst

      I think that is okay now.

7 Isolating - avoid friends - daily 8 TV - Daily affair

      Doing great

10 Nail biting - daily

      Unchanged

 

 

A: Patient is doing very well in all major symptoms. The only symptoms that are holding out are the biting nails and perhaps the physical restlessness. I told him we'll be spacing out follow-ups to every three months for a few more follow-ups, then they’ll be as needed.

 

 

Final Case Note: The last Consultation was Tuesday, June 27, 2006. At that intake the patient was doing very well. All symptoms were either entirely gone or so markedly improved that he was not concerned. The only symptom that was unchanged was nail biting. I suggested we end formal treatment at this point. We could have worked on the nail biting and perhaps deepening the improvements, but this seemed unnecessary. I also got the idea he was coming to treatment at this point a bit blindly. I wanted to give him the choice to resume treatment from his volition. He agreed this was a good idea. I was also concerned because up til now his mother had been paying and I know he has a low paying job.

 

[Farokh Master]

Often extreme fear of dark and will not go into an unlit room; they will see monsters in the dark.

[Dr. Subrata K. Banerjea]

Terrors of alcoholic father: Stram.

Terrors of witnessing violence: Stram.

[Paul Herscu]

Along with the mental-emotional realm and the nervous system, the realm of sleep offers the most insight into the Stramonium cycle. In fact this area is so rich in confirmatory symptoms that if you have a child with absolutely no sleep symptoms to verify a prescription of Stramonium, it is unlikely to be the correct remedy.

That there are so many sleep symptoms is not surprising, for it is during sleep and in the process of drifting off to sleep, that the conscious mind finally relinquishes control and the unconscious mind takes over. It is here, in the night, that everything held in check during the day will finally be expressed. The intense battle-line between conscious and unconscious, so carefully drawn throughout

the day, shifts during the night, as one side loses its ability to fight and the other gains in power. As the images of death increase, the segments having to do with stillness, with death, grow stronger, and this serves to intensify the segment of fear in the child.

This battle can be witnessed in three different are as.

The presence of symptoms in any one of these areas can be used to confirm the need for Stramonium:

• Fears before Sleep

• Nightmares and Night Terrors

• General Sleep Symptoms

Each of these categories will be presented separately, but first I would like to draw the reader's attention to a valuable book for understanding children's sleep, Richard Ferber's “Solve Your Child's Sleep Problems”, Published by Simon and Schuster. This book is most helpful in developing a fuller understanding of sleep cycles and sleep disturbances. I strongly recommend chapters 1. 4, 5 for parents and clinicians alike.

Fears Before Sleep - Fear of going to bed is a fairly characteristic symptom found in most Stramonium children. Many young children will be unable to voice specific reasons for their fears, but older children will commonly admit to: fear of the dark, of monsters, of being left alone, and such fears as are often associated with movies and stories recently seen or heard.

A more common cause for bedtime fears, whether the child verbalizes it or not, is a previous history of terrifying dreams. It is the terror of repeating such dreams that makes a Stramonium child fear going to sleep.

One gets the feeling that there is a battle raging within the child between a dark demonic side and the forces of light. Each night, there surfaces within the child an overwhelming sense that, at some deep level, he is about to go through those same horrible visions: visions of torture, of terror. And so, each night, he resists his parents' attempts to put him to bed, and even more desperately resists falling asleep.

Many authorities on sleep disorders believe that nighttime fears are brought about by some stress or anxiety that has occurred during the day but only surfaces at night. The stresses may be external in origin, such as fear of being separated from the mother or the kind of fears that often accompany a divorce. There may also exist a justify able fear of being beaten or violated in some way, which can develop after the child has been abused.

Even one beating can bring on such fear.

Stresses may also be internal in origin. At the time when the child is developing impulse control, when he wants to misbehave, his impulsive side may begin to struggle with and fight against his controlling side. Most children ultimately work this out, but the Stramonium child does not. In observing the child's attempts to establish control over impulses, the parent or practitioner will witness the following sequence unfolding in an introverted Stramonium child: first, he feels a strong impulse to misbehave (the violent overreaction segment), then guilt over this impulse mounts (the closing off/introversion segment), so he struggles to control it, which makes him hypervigilant and anxious about relinquishing control (the shut down/dead segment). No wonder he becomes increasingly more fearful of going to bed and has so much trouble falling asleep. He worries and worries, although quite unable to pinpoint why he is worried in the first place. In truth, he is worrying about his own impulses. The darkness or monsters that these children fear are nothing more than their own impulses buried deep in the unconscious. The horrible nightmares and night terrors spring out from these buried impulses. Herman Melville expressed this well in Pierre, "One trembles to think of that mysterious thing in the soul, which seems to acknowledge no human jurisdiction, but in spite of

the individual's own innocent self, will still dream horrid dreams and mutter unmentionable thoughts."

In the Stramonium child you are likely to see certain typical behaviors at bedtime. Many of these, in one way or another, exemplify the rubric:

MIND: Clinging. During the preverbal stage, from eight to fifteen months, the child may scream when being put to bed. No matter how hard a mother may try to ensure a smooth, love-filled transition from the waking state into the sleep state, the outcome is more likely to be such loud shrieking that it renders her temporarily deaf. Despite continued attempts on her part to soothe the child, he will shut his eyes tight and scream at the top of his lungs. This bedtime shrieking often resembles that of Med. Tub. Lyc. Cham. Borax, Cina or Calc-p.

All the mother's warm, soothing words and the loving tone of voice do not penetrate through whatever horrible thing it is that envelops the child at that time.

So every night a push/pull scenario takes place. When picked up, the little one will struggle and resist and pull away, which only exasperates the parent. At the very same time he may be asking to sleep in the parents' bed, where he sleeps best (actually in contact with the parent).

Sometimes he will be content if the parent lies down with him in his bed, but as he drifts off, as soon as the parent attempts to rise quietly and tiptoe away, the child will startle, half-awake, and begin to cry anew.

An older child will be more likely to express his fear of going to sleep by acting out or by strongly resisting any request made throughout the evening that even hints of bedtime. A simple suggestion such as, "Time to brush your teeth," will set the child off like a time-bomb. The parents begin to wonder if their child is crazy The therapist may describe him as irrational, impulsive, or oppositional. Yet, in reality, the child is scared witless but lacks the verbal maturity required to express it. Often the parent, failing to realize what's behind this irritating and confusing behavior, tries to force the child to go to sleep. But because he is unable to express what is bothering him, he resists, and a major conflict follows. These bedtime wars only further disrupt the already shaky parent/child relationship.

Unfortunately, the battle waged between parent and child over the terrain of the Stramonium's psyche never engages the real enemy (the fear, the isolation, the confusion). Moreover, the conflict only seems to deepen the child's pain, causing a further expansion of the breach in the containment of his unconscious, which results in his spiralling even deeper within thesame cycle.

The Stramonium child experiences these injunctions and actions (such as forcing him to go to bed) as attempts to alienate or isolate him.

Even worse, he feels abandoned to his fate—a night full of hideous visions.

To deal with these fears, the child may develop an almost opposite strategy to the time-bomb behavior, a strategy of over-control.

He may begin to act rigidly, even exhibit ritualistic behaviors.

One parent described her daughter's bedtime ritual. "She insists that I read the same book every night. Then I have to rub her back clockwise for a while, then counter-clockwise. Then she turns, sighs, and says, 'Go,' dismissing

me with a word, as if my services are no longer required."

If the child is older, he may be able to articulate his nighttime fears, citing specific events from the past that frightened him. Some children report frights from experiences such as being attacked by a person or an animal.

They become increasingly upset by the possibility of this fright recurring as night closes in.

Fears Before Sleep

Fear of going to bed is a fairly characteristic symptom found in most Stramonium children. Many young children will be unable to voice specific reasons for their fears, but older children will commonly admit to: fear of the dark, of monsters, of being left alone, and such fears as are often associated with movies and stories recently seen or heard.

A more common cause for bedtime fears, whether the child verbalizes it or not, is a previous history of terrifying dreams. It is the terror of repeating such dreams that makes a Stramonium child fear going to sleep. One gets the feeling that there is a battle raging within the child between a dark demonic side and the forces of light. Each night, there surfaces within the child an overwhelming sense that, at some deep level, he is about to go through those same horrible visions - visions of torture, of terror. And so, each night, he resists his parents' attempts to put him to bed, and even more desperately resists falling asleep.

Many authorities on sleep disorders believe that nighttime fears are brought about by some stress or anxiety that has occurred during the day but only surfaces at night. The stresses may be external in origin, such as fear of being separated from the mother or the kind of fears that often accompany a divorce. There may also exist a justifiable fear of being beaten or violated in some way, which can develop after the child has been abused.

Even one beating can bring on such fear.

Stresses may also be internal in origin. At the time when the child is developing impulse control, when he wants to misbehave, his impulsive side may begin to struggle with and fight against his controlling side.

Most children ultimately work this out, but the Stram.-child does not. In observing the child's attempts to establish control over impulses, the parent or practitioner will witness the following sequence

unfolding in an introverted Stram-child: first, he feels a strong impulse to misbehave (the violent overreaction segment), then guilt over this impulse mounts (the closing off/introversion segment),

so he struggles to control it, which makes him hypervigilant and anxious about relinquishing control (the shut down/dead segment). No wonder he becomes increasingly more fearful of going to bed and has so much trouble falling asleep. He worries and worries, although quite unable to pinpoint why he is worried in the first place. In truth, he is worrying about his own impulses. The darkness or monsters that these children fear are nothing more than their own impulses buried deep in the unconscious. The horrible nightmares and night terrors spring out from these buried impulses.

Herman Melville expressed this well in Pierre, "One trembles to think of that mysterious thing in the soul, which seems to acknowledge no human jurisdiction, but in spite of the individual's own innocent self, will still dream horrid dreams and mutter unmentionable thoughts."

In the Stram-child you are likely to see certain typical behaviors at bedtime. Many of these, in one way or another, exemplify the rubric:

MIND: Clinging. During the preverbal stage, from 8 - 15 months, the child may scream when being put to bed. No matter how hard a mother may try to ensure a smooth, love-filled transition from the waking state into the sleep state, the outcome is more likely to be such loud shrieking that it renders her temporarily deaf. Despite continued attempts on her part to soothe the child, he will shut his eyes tight and scream at the top of his lungs. This bedtime shrieking often resembles that of Med., Tub., Lyc., Cham., Borx., Cina. or Calc-p..

All the mother's warm, soothing words and the loving tone of voice do not penetrate through whatever horrible thing it is that envelops the child at that time. So every night a push/pull scenario takes place. When picked up, the little one will struggle and resist and pull away, which only exasperates the parent. At the very same time he may be asking to sleep in the parents' bed, where he sleeps best, especially if actually in contact with the parent.

Sometimes he will be content if the parent lies down with him in his bed, but as he drifts off, as soon as the parent attempts to rise quietly and tiptoe away, the child will startle, half-awake, and begin to cry anew.

An older child will be more likely to express his fear of going to sleep by acting out or by strongly resisting any request made throughout the evening that even hints of bedtime. A simple suggestion such as, "Time to brush your teeth," will set the child off like a time-bomb. The parents begin to wonder if their child is crazy The therapist may describe him as irrational, impulsive, or oppositional. Yet, in reality, the child is scared witless but lacks the verbal maturity required to express it. Often the parent, failing to realize what's behind this irritating and confusing behavior, tries to force the child to go to sleep. But because he is unable to express what is bothering him, he resists, and a major conflict follows. These bedtime wars only further disrupt the already shaky parent/child relationship.

Unfortunately, the battle waged between parent and child over the terrain of the Stramonium's psyche never engages the real enemy (the fear, the isolation, the confusion). Moreover, the conflict only seems to deepen the child's pain, causing a further expansion of the breach in the containment of his unconscious, which results in his spiraling even deeper within the same cycle.

The Stramonium child experiences these injunctions and actions (such as forcing him to go to bed) as attempts to alienate or isolate him. Even worse, he feels abandoned to his fate - a night full of hideous visions. To deal with these fears, the child may develop an almost opposite strategy to the time-bomb behavior, a strategy of over-control.

He may begin to act rigidly, even exhibit ritualistic behaviors.

One parent described her daughter's bedtime ritual. "She insists that I read the same book every night. Then I have to rub her back clockwise for a while, then counter-clockwise. Then she turns, sighs, and says, 'Go,' dismissing me with a word, as if my services are no longer required."

If the child is older, he may be able to articulate his nighttime fears, citing specific events from the past that frightened him. Some children report frights from experiences such as being attacked by

a person or an animal. They become increasingly upset by the possibility of this fright recurring as night closes in.

[Paul Herscu]

Nach der geistig emotionalen Sphäre und dem Nervensystem bietet der Schlaf den tiefsten Einblick in das Stramonium-Gemüt. Dieser Bereich liefert viele bestätigende Symptome, daß Stramonium höchstwahrscheinlich nicht das richtige Mittel ist, wenn ein Kind keinerlei Schlafsymptome zur Bestätigung der Verschreibung hat. Es ist nicht verwunderlich, daß die Schlafsymptome so vielfältig sind,

zumal das Bewußtsein während des Schlafes und im Verlauf des Einschlafens seine Kontrolle aufgibt, und das Unbewußte die Führung übernimmt. In der Nacht kommt all das zum Ausdruck, was während

des Tages in Schach gehalten wurde. Der intensive Kampf zwischen Bewußtsein und Unbewußtem, der während des Tages unentschieden bleibt, verlagert sich im Verlauf der Nacht, da eine Seite ihre Kampfkraft verliert und die andere in Fahrt kommt. Die Schlafsymptome von Stramonium fallen unter drei Kategorien, von denen jede getrennt besprochen wird:

1.      Furcht vor dem Schlafen;

2.      Alpträume und nächtliche panikartige Ängste (Nachtschrecken);

3.      Allgemeine Schlafsymptome.

Wenn aus einer dieser drei Kategorien Symptome vorliegen, so können diese die Verschreibung bestätigen. Bevor wir uns diesen Bereichen zuwenden, möchte ich den Leser auf ein wertvolles Buch zum Verständnis des Schlafes bei Kindern aufmerksam machen.

Richard Ferbers "Solve your Child's Sleep Problems" (= Lösen Sie die Schlafprobleme Ihres Kindes), erschienen bei Simon and Schuster, ist äußerst hilfreich, um ein tieferes Verständnis für Schlafzyklen

und Schlafstörungen zu entwickeln. Ich empfehle ganz besonders die Kapitel 1, 4 und 5, für Eltern und Therapeuten gleichermaßen. Furcht vor dem Schlafen Die Furcht vor dem Schlafengehen ist ein recht charakteristisches Symptom bei den meisten Stramonium-Kindern. Die meisten kleinen Kinder sind nicht in der Lage, die Ursachen zu bestimmen und auszudrücken, aber wenn sie alt genug sind, werden die folgenden Ängste am häufigsten angegeben:

Furcht vor Dunkelheit, vor Ungeheuern, alleingelassen zu werden und Furcht in Verbindung mit Filmen und Geschichten, die sie kürzlich gesehen oder gehört haben. Eine noch wichtigere Ursache, ganz gleich ob das Kind sie angibt oder nicht - ist das Erlebnis von vorhergegangenen furchterregenden Träumen. Aufgrund der entsetzlichen Angst vor diesen Träumen hat das Stramonium-Kind in den darauffolgenden Nächten Furcht vor dem Einschlafen. Man bekommt das Gefühl, daß ein Kampf zwischen den Mächten des Lichts und einer dunklen dämonischen Seite stattfindet, ein Kampf, der im Innern des Kindes wütet. Jede Nacht hat das Kind auf einer bestimmten Ebene seines Seins das überwältigende Gefühl, daß es im Begriff ist, dieselben schrecklichen Bilder erneut zu durchleben - Visionen von Horror, Folter, Entsetzen - somit sträubt sich das Kind jede Nacht gegen die Bemühungen der Eltern, es zu Bett zu bringen und wehrt sich verzweifelt gegen das Einschlafen. Viele Fachleute auf dem Gebiet von Schlafstörungen glauben, daß nächtliche Ängste auf Stress oder Angst während des Tages zurückzuführen sind, die aber nur während der Nacht an die Oberfläche kommen. Diese können in äußeren Belastungen ihren Ursprung haben, wie zum Beispiel Furcht vor Trennung von der Mutter oder Ängste in Verbindung mit der Trennung der Eltern. Es kann auch eine gerechtfertigte Furcht vor Schlägen oder Verletzungen irgendeiner Art vorliegen, die sich nach ein- oder mehrmaligen Misshandlungen entwickeln kann. Die Belastungen können auch im Inneren des Kindes ihren Ursprung haben. Während sich die Kontrolle von Impulsen entwickelt, kann das Kind, weil es sich ungezogen verhalten will, anfangen, gegen seine verinnerlichte kontrollierende Seite zu kämpfen. Bei den meisten Kindern funktioniert das, bei dem Stramonium-Kind jedoch nicht. Als Folge versucht das Kind, seine Impulse unter Kontrolle zu bringen, und Eltern oder Therapeuten werden Zeugen dieser Folge erscheint, wie sie sich in dem introvertierten Stramonium-Kind entfaltet: Das Kind empfindet einen starken Impuls zur Ungezogenheit; Schuld wegen dieses Impulses steigt auf; übermäßige Kontrolle setzt ein; schließlich wird das Kind übervorsichtig und ängstlich und findet es schwierig, auf Kontrolle zu verzichten, was so weit geht, daß es sich selbst nicht erlauben kann einzuschlafen. Nachts nimmt dann die Angst vor dem Einschlafen zu. Es macht sich ständig Sorgen, ohne jedoch begreifen zu können, worum es sich Sorgen macht. Die Ungeheuer oder die Dunkelheit, die diese Kinder fürchten, sind in Wirklichkeit ihre eigenen Impulse, die tief im Unterbewusstsein begraben liegen. Alpträume und Nachtschrecken entwickeln sich aus ähnlichen Ursachen. Es gibt zahlreiche Verhaltensweisen zur Schlafenszeit, die für das Stramonium-Kind typisch sind. Im präverbalen Alter, zwischen 8 und 15 Monaten, kann das Kind schreien, wenn es zu Bett gebracht wird. Selbst wenn die Eltern sich um einen zarten, liebevollen Übergang vom Wachzustand in den Schlaf bemühen, resultieren diese Bemühungen wahrscheinlich eher in vorübergehender Taubheit der Eltern durch die lauten Schreie des Kindes. Die Eltern versuchen das Kind zu beruhigen, aber Stramonium schließt die Augen und schreit sich die Lungen aus dem Hals. Die beruhigenden Worte und der liebevolle Klang der Stimme erreichen es nicht. Das Geschrei zur Schlafenszeit bei diesem Kind könnte an Med. Tub. Lyc. Cham. Borax, Cina oder Calc-p. erinnern. Ein zähes Tauziehen beginnt: einerseits kämpft das Kind und distanziert sich von den Eltern, bis diese verärgert sind; andererseits schläft es, wenn überhaupt, am besten im elterlichen Bett, am allerbesten in Körperkontakt mit den Eltern. Wenn Mutter oder Vater versuchen, ganz leise aufzustehen und sich davonzuschleichen, fährt das Kind im Halbschlaf zusammen und fängt

erneut an zu schreien. Ältere Kinder drücken ihre Furcht vor dem Einschlafen durch Kämpfe und Widerstand gegen alles, was von ihnen am Abend verlangt wird aus. Die Eltern beginnen zu glauben, ihr Kind sei verrückt. Wenn sie eine einfache Forderung an das Kind stellen, so zum Beispiel, "putz dir die Zähne", explodiert es wie eine Bombe. Die Eltern oder der Therapeut kommen vielleicht zu dem Schluss, das Kind sei irrational, impulsiv oder widerspenstig. In Wahrheit jedoch verliert es den Verstand aus Angst, aber ihm fehlt die Reife, dies verbal auszudrücken. Weil sie das nicht erkennen, versuchen die Eltern häufig das Kind zum Schlafen zu zwingen. Weil das Kind nicht ausdrücken kann, was es bedrückt, widersetzt es sich, und es folgt ein ernster Konflikt, der eine erhebliche Störung in der Eltern-Kindbeziehung verursacht. Unglücklicherweise bezieht der Kampf zwischen Eltern und Kind auf dem Terrain der Stramonium-Psyche niemals den wahren Feind ein (Ängste, Isolation und Verwirrung) und daher wird der wahre Kampf unweigerlich fehlschlagen. Dieser Konflikt schmerzt das Kind nur noch mehr und verursacht eine Ausweitung des Loches oder der Lücke in dem Abwehrsystem seines Unterbewusstseins.

Das Stramonium-Kind erlebt die Anordnungen und Handlungen seiner Eltern -wenn sie es zum Zubettgehen zwingen- als Handlungen der Entfremdung, Isolation und fühlt sich häufig als werde es einem Schicksal voller gräßlicher Visionen überlassen werden. Eine andere Strategie, die das Kind entwickeln kann, um mit seiner Furcht fertig zu werden, und die beinahe das Gegenteil zu dem gerade beschriebenen Verhalten darstellt, ist übermäßige Kontrolle. Das Kind fängt an, rituelle Verhaltensweisen zu zeigen. Eine Mutter berichtete: "Ich muss jeden Abend dasselbe Buch lesen. Dann muss ich ihr eine zeitlang den Rücken im Uhrzeigersinn reiben, dann entgegen den Uhrzeigersinn. Danach dreht sie sich um, seufzt und sagt 'geh'. Sie entlässt mich mit diesem Wort, als würden meine Dienste nicht länger benötigt." Wenn das Kind noch älter ist, kann es vielleicht seine nächtlichen Ängste artikulieren. Danach gefragt, wird das Stramonium-Kind vielleicht spezifische Ereignisse in seinem Leben erwähnen, die es erschreckt haben. Die häufigsten Ängste, die im heutigen Nordamerika angesprochen werden, stammen aus Gewalt, die Kinder im Fernsehen oder in Filmen sehen und die ihr Gefühl von Unsicherheit in der Welt steigern. Möglich ist auch ein spezifischer ätiologischer Schrecken, den sie erlebt haben, wie zum Beispiel, wenn sie durch eine Person oder ein Tier angegriffen worden sind. Wenn die Nacht hereinbricht, werden sie von der Angst heimgesucht, daß dieser Schrecken wiederkehren könnte. Wie in dem 'Gemüt'-Abschnitt erwähnt, hat das Stramonium-Kind große Furcht vor Dunkelheit. Diese Furcht drückt sich besonders stark in der Nacht aus und häufig in Form intensiver Furcht verlassen zu werden und im Dunkeln allein zu sein. Um dies zu lindern, lassen die Eltern vielleicht ein Nachtlicht an, um das Kind zu beruhigen. Ein Unterscheidungsmerkmal, wie von George Vithoulkas als erstem erwähnt, ist, daß die Stramonium-Kinder sogar nachdem sie eingeschlafen sind oft aufwachen und schreien, wenn man das Licht ausschaltet; viele andere Arzneimittelbilder werden nicht wegen eines plötzlich verdunkelten Raumes aufwachen. Die spezifischsten Modalitäten der Ängste bestehen darin, daß sie verschlimmert werden, wenn das Kind einen beängstigenden Film sieht, eine furchterregende Geschichte hört, oder abends duscht oder badet. Wenn das Kind allein in einem dunklen Raum schläft, können dadurch die Ängste ebenfalls intensiviert werden. Schlafen mit dem Elternteil, zu dem sie die engste Beziehung haben, ebenso wie Schlafen bei Licht hilft, diese Ängste zu lindern. Doch meiner Erfahrung nach ist es nicht ratsam, das Stramonium-Kind, das unter nächtlichen Ängsten leidet, dazu zu ermutigen, im Bett der Eltern zu schlafen. Häufig wird das Kind dadurch mit der Zeit zunehmend abhängiger und furchtsamer. Nach mehreren Monaten kann das Kind sogar den Platz eines Elternteils einnehmen, da das Bett mit der Zeit für drei Personen nicht mehr groß genug ist. Dadurch wird das Gegenteil von dem erreicht, was beabsichtigt war. Bei Stramonium besonders schlägt das 'Familienbett' Arrangement nicht nur fehl, wie Eltern beklagen, sondern schlägt geradezu zurück; es verstärkt und erhöht die Furcht verlassen zu werden, anstatt sie zu verringern. Wie viele Psychologen empfehlen, ist es wichtig, daß das Kind tagsüber soviel wie möglich qualitativ wertvolle Zeit in seinem eigenen Zimmer zubringt; dort spielt oder daß die Eltern ihm dort etwas vorlesen. Das wird dem Kind helfen, sich in seinem eigenen Zimmer sicher zu fühlen, bis es ein sicherer Hafen für es wird, ein Ort, an dem es weiß, daß es sich gehen lassen kann. Was die Furcht des Kindes vor einem dunklen Zimmer angeht, so rate ich Eltern oft, eine Lichtquelle im Raum anzulassen; die meisten Kinder schlafen besser bei gedämpftem Licht, und wenn sie nachts aufwachen, haben sie auch genügend Beleuchtung, um sich zu orientieren.

 

Mind:

Mentally retarded or congenitally deformed children where the mother was injured, either physically or emotionally, e.g. disappointment in love, fright,

grief, marital tortures, reproaches, etc. (Bufo. Carc. Hyos. Kali-br. Op. Ph-ac).

Clinging, and subjugated behavior toward the parents, chiefly arising from an insecurity or fear of losing them.

Physical:

Involuntary movements (Crot-c. Cupr-met. Hell. Merc. Zinc-met.) such as tremors, chorea, and twitching from fright or reprimand.

Easily develops convulsions from fever.

Neurological affections after strong emotions like fright or mortification, or from suppressed ear discharge.

Paralysis of one side of the body, with convulsions of the other.

Other important symptoms

Mind:

Acts funny and makes foolish gestures all the time (Bell. Hyos. Verat).

Aversion to water (Bell. Hyos. Lyss. Phos); even the noise of running water scares him.

Behavioral problems in children (Anac. Cham. Cina. Hyos. Med. Tarent. Tub. Verat) from abuse (Anac. Carc. Lyss. Med), fright (Carc. Op),

Reproaches (Ambr. Op. Plat. Staph) and violence (Aur-met. Bry. Carc)

Child is very active and cheerful, with a tendency to keep jumping, climbing, and dancing all the time (Bell. Cic. Hyos. Tarent).

Children tend to bite (Bell. Op), claw or kick others (Bell. Cham. Tub), pull the hair (Bell. Lil-t. Tarent. Tub),

stamp their feet (Verat), and strike (Cham. Cina. Cur. Tub) in anger.

Destructive (Carc. Cupr-met. Hyos. Tub); desire to break things and tear clothing and pillow.

Disobedient, stubborn, mischievous, quarrelsome, and abusive children (Cham. Hyos. Nux-v. Tub. Verat)

Fear of ghosts and animals (black dogs) (Bell) and spiders (Arg-n. Cupr-met. Nat-m. Phos. Sep. Tarent).

Fearful at night (to darkness); needs company and light (Arg-n. Ars. Hep. Lyc. Phos)

Loquacity and delirium during fever (Bapt. Lach. Sulph)

Makes a lot of mistakes when speaking or writing (Cham. Sil); will omit or transpose letters or words; or calls things by the wrong name. Poor

handwriting, writes indistinctly (Lyc).

Refuses to take medicine (Arn. Hyos. Lach)

Taciturn child (Cocc. Gels. Op. Puls. Verat); sits stiffly, wrapped in deep thoughts, without moving.

Violent anger, that tends to erupt suddenly, # cheerfulness and playful mood (Aur-met. Coff. Ign).

Anxiety and fear in the presence of strangers; evades their glance.

Aversion to the color black.

Blushes easily.

Capricious children; constantly need change.

Child refuses to answer, or answers irrelevantly or incorrectly.

Children who tend to boast and make up false stories.

Dreamy children who find it very difficult to concentrate in their studies.

Fear of falling or getting hurt, and so are extremely careful and cautious.

Inaccurate judgment of distance, due to which ends up colliding with things.

Loves to read extravagant stories.

Spasmodic, and loud laughter at trifles (Bell. Cann-i. Hyos. Mosch).

Tends to shriek a lot (before (Cic. Cupr-met) and during convulsions (Lyc. Op), during fever (Bell. Caps), and in sleep (Borx, Lyc, Puls, Zinc).

Head:

Basilar meningitis (Bell. Hell. Op) and encephalitis from suppressed otorrhea

Congestion of head with rage (Bell. Op)

Violent headaches (Bell. Cact. Glon. Meli) (occipital region) with lachrymation and vomiting; < from going out in the sun/jar/on looking at bright objects; > cold applications (Aloe. Psor. Spig) and sitting in a dark room (Bell. Lac-d. Sang. Sil).

Examination findings:

- Bores the head into the pillow (Apis. Bell. Hell. Tub).

- Can’t hold the head, seems to keep falling sideways or backwards.

- CT Scan: Cerebral haemorrhage.

- Hydrocephalus.

- Increased intracranial tension.

- Involuntary movements of the head (Agar. Cann-i. Caust. Hell. Zinc): Jerking, rising spasmodically from the pillow, rolling, and throwing the head backwards.

- Kernig’s sign +

- Wrinkling of forehead with headache and in cases of brain affection.

Eyes:

Paralysis of the optic nerve (Bell. Gels. Kali-i. Phos. Puls. Sil)

Photophobia (when angry) (Acon. Bell. Hyos)

Strabismus after fright (Cic. Nux-m)

Examination findings:

- Eyes half-open in sleep (Bell. Cocc. Lyc) and when delirious (Crot-h)

- Staring, brilliant, wide-open eyes with headache (Bell. Glon. Spig).

- Wild look of the eyes (Bell. Lyss. Nux-v), which seem to protrude (Bell. Ferr-i. Nat-m)

- Constant rolling or pendulum-like swaying of the eyes from side to side.

- Cortical blindness.

- Myopic.

- Pupils dilated, especially after being reprimanded or reproached

- Squinting with brain affections.

- Twitching of the upper lids.

Ears:

Impaired hearing with noises (Caust. Lyc. Merc. Sil), as if hearing some kind of music or singing (Chin. Kali-c)

Caries of mastoid process extending to the meninges.

Complaints arise after suppression of any ear discharge (Carb-v. Merc).

Nose:

Paroxysmal sneezing.

Obstruction of the left nostril.

Examination findings:

- Epistaxis of black, clotted blood (Cham. Chin. Ip. Rhus-t)

- Wrinkles from nose to corners of mouth (Calc. Staph. Sulph).

- Pale discoloration of alae nasi.

Face:

Examination findings:

- Bluish discoloration of face with dyspnoea (Arg-n. Brom. Bry. Op)

- Chewing motion of the jaw (Bry. Calc. Hell. Lyc. Phos. Verat-v)

- Cold perspiration on the face (Carb-v. Cina. Merc-c. Verat).

- Prominent linea nasalis (Aeth. Ant-t. Cina. Ip. Phos. Tarent)

- Trembling of lips when talking (Agar. Bell. Gels. Zinc)

- Vacant (Camph. Hell. Phos) and frightened (Acon. Bapt) expression.

- Drop jaw.

- Erysipelas, involving one side of the face and the nose.

- Hot, red and swollen face, with cold limbs.

- Risus sardonicus.

- Swelling and inflammation of the submaxillary and parotid glands (r.)

- Swelling, ulceration, and cracks on lips (lower) due to constant picking and peeling.

Mouth:

Difficult dentition (Borx. Calc. Cham. Mag-m. Nux-v. Sil. Sulph)

Difficult speech from chorea (Agar. Bufo. Caust. Cupr-met. Mag-p)

Grinding of teeth during sleep (Bac. Bell. Cina. Tub) and when angry (Hyos. Kali-c. Lyc)

Aphasia with paralysis of tongue.

Excessive stammering (Bell. Caust. Merc.); has to exert himself for a long time before he can even utter a single word.

Examination findings:

- Biting of tongue during convulsions (Art-v. Bufo. Cic. Cupr-met. Oena. Op).

- Desire to clench the teeth together all the time (Bell. Cic. Hyos. Merc).

- Tongus pointed (Chel. Lach. Plb), cracked (Ars-i. Fl-ac. Hyos. Nit-ac. Phos. Rhus-t) and indented (Merc. Rhus-t. Sep)

tongue, coated white, with raised red papillae and seems stiff, with trembling on protrusion.

- Open mouth with dribbling of saliva.

- Pale discoloration around the mouth.

- Sordes on the teeth.

Throat:

Choking on drinking (Hyos. Nat-m), due to difficulty in swallowing (liquids) (Brom. Coc-c. Hyos. Ign. Lach), from paralysis

Or spasms of the esophagus (Alum. Ars. Caust. Gels. Op. Plb)

Dryness of the throat, not better by drinking, with constant disposition to hem and hawk.

Examination findings:

- Goiter.

- Visible pulsation of the carotids.

Stomach:

Insatiable thirst for large quantities of water during fever (Bry. Eup-per) and on waking in the morning (Acon. Mag-m. Nat-m)

Violent hiccoughs with convulsions (Cic. Cupr-met. Hyos. Nat-m)

Bilious green vomiting on coughing, and from the slightest exertion.

Foul eructations in the evening.

Intense retching, even after vomiting.

Ravenous appetite with diarrhea.

Vomiting during fever and from exposure to a bright light.

Aversions: Cold drinks (Lyc. Sabad. Verat), mother’s milk (Borx. Calc-sil. Cina. Sil) and water (Hyos. Nux-v. Staph);

Desires: Buttermilk/sour food (Acon. Cor-r. Hep. Verat)/spinach (Calc-p. Lac-leo. Symph)/vinegar;

Abdoemn:

Cramping, griping pains in the abdomen before stool (Aloe. Arg-n. Chin. Coloc. Mag-c. Podo. Sulph); > bending forwards.

Inflammation of the cecum (Apis. Bell. Bry. Lach. Merc. Rhus-t)

Examination findings:

- Swelling of the inguinal glands.

- Tympanitic distention of the abdomen.

Rectum:

Cholera infantum.

Diarrhea in children when looking at bright shining objects or when alone in the dark.

Passes offensive flatus.

Retention of stool, with ineffectual urging and straining.

Watery, black, putrid stools; passed involuntary when urinating.

Urinary organs:

Copious nocturnal enuresis from emotional disturbances like fright (Op) or reprimand (Staph)

Involuntary dribbling of urine after stool or urination (Arg-n. Ars. Hyos. Mur-ac. Phos. Zinc)

Retention of urine during epilepsy and fever (Ferr-p. Op).

Acute parenchymatous nephritis.

Copious and frequent flow of urine during fever or after delirium; urinates otherwise seldom.

Retarded flow of urine; must wait and press for a long time for the flow to start; the urine ceases to flow if he stops to breathe.

Examination findings:

- Spasmodic stricture of the urethra (Canth. Nit-ac).

- Urine: Albumin ++

Male organs:

Child constantly handles his genitals and masturbates, even during convulsions (Bufo. Calc. Lach. Plat)

Examination findings:

- Retracted testes.

Larynx and Trachea:

Examination findings:

- Edema of the glottis.

- Laryngismus stridulus.

- Paralysis of the larynx.

- Voice changed to a squeaky or a very hoarse, indistinct tone.

Respiratory organs:

Audible rattling of mucus in chest during sleep, worse before midnight.

Breathless when talking, better when in the open air.

Impeded, gasping respiration from spasms of the chest.

Spasmodic asthma in nervous children, who fall into a deep slumber during an acute attack, with snoring.

Examination findings:

- Abdominal respiration (Ant-t. Ferr-met. Phos. Spong).

- Moaning (Ant-t. Op), sighing and stertorous (Am-c. Op) respiration.

- Slow inspiration and a forcible, puffed out, quick expiration.

Cough:

Asthmatic, rattling cough in the morning (Agar).

Chronic, deep, barking (Bell. Dros. Hep. Spong), exhausting cough day and night (Cupr-met. Kali-c. Spong. Stann-met).

Cough from cold drinks, fright (Acon. Arg-n. Bell. Cina. Ign. Rhus-t), open wind or cold air, and when looking at a light or shiny object.

Face becomes dark red (Bar-c. Cor-r. Kali-c. Squil), with jerking up of the lower limbs when coughing.

Paroxysmal, dry coughing from being touched on the larynx or when talking or singing.

Chest:

Chronic allergic bronchitis in immunocompromised children (Kali-c. Tub)

Pneumonia after typhoid fever (Ant-t. Bry. Op. Phos).

Examination findings:

- Consolidation of the right lung (Brom. Bry. Kali-c. Lyc. Merc. Sang).

- Abscess of lungs.

- Convulsions of the chest muscles.

Violent palpitations of the chest after exertion, fright (Acon. Aur-m. Coff. Op) or when coughing (Calc. Nat-m. Puls. Sulph)

Examination findings:

- Murmurs.

- Pulse: Slow, soft, weak, almost imperceptible, OR full, hard, frequent.

Back:

Spine is sensitive to the slightest of pressure (Chinin-s. Zinc-met).

Sensation of intense chilliness, which seems to extend down the back.

Examination findings:

- Opisthotonos (Bell. Cic. Cupr-met. Hyos. Nux-v. Op. Stry)

- Spasmodic stiffness of the cervical region; cannot bend head backwards.

Limbs:

Awkward; drops things, or tends to miss a step when descending the staircase, often causing him to trip and fall (Agar. Apis. Bov. Nat-m)

Chorea from fear (Calc. Caust. Ign. Kali-br. Laur. Nat-m. Zinc-met), anxiety, or after excessive dancing (Bell. Hyos)

Rheumatic affection or suppuration with intense pain and tenderness of the hip joint (Calc. Calc-p. Kali-c. Nat-s. Sil. Tub) (l.) (Nat-s)

Cold perspiration of the feet and the legs.

Painless paralysis of lower limbs after spasms.

Trembling of the feet, or of the hands on holding anything.

Examination findings:

- Boils on the feet (Calc. Led. Lyc. Sil)

- Involuntary jerking or twitching of one foot and one hand (Cina. Graph. Hyos. Kali-br).

- Choreoform movements involving the left arm and right leg; cannot walk, must run or jump and move about.

- Clenching of the fingers, especially the thumb.

- Icy coldness with bluish discoloration of the fingernails, hands and feet.

- Slow contraction of the muscles and tendons of hands, alternating with those in the feet.

Sleep:

Dreams: Fights, quarrels, frightful nightmares (Borx. Carc. Kali-p).

During sleep: Eyes remain open, froth from the mouth (Sil), grinds his teeth (Ars. Bac. Bell. Cina. Tub), laughs, moans loudly, restless with

tossing about, shrieks, sobs, snores, talks, weeps, and whimpers.

Sleeps in agenupectoral position (Calc-p. Carc. Lyc. Med. Phos. Tub), kneeling forwards with knees and elbows flexed, and his head bored into the pillow.

Sleepiness after any kind of excitement.

Starting suddenly from fright in sleep.

Fever:

Aversion to uncover during all the stages of the fever.

Eruptive fevers like scarlatina and measles (Acon. Apis. Bry. Euphr. Puls. Sulph)

Chill: - Icy coldness of the hands and feet with a bluish discoloration.

- Violent descending chills, with delirium.

- < the slightest bit of uncovering; better by warm wraps.

Heat: - Hot head and face , with a bluish discoloration of the hands and feet, which are icy-cold to touch (Eup-per. Lyc. Meny. Phos. Verat)

OR burning dry heat of the body with coldness of the head and face, with violent delirium.

- Insatiable thirst for large quantities of water (Bry. Eup-per. Nat-m,).

- Loquacity (Bapt. Gels. Lach. Pyrog. Tub), restlessness (Ars. Op. Puls. Rhus-t), and shrieking (Bell. Caps. Cham. Coff. Op); child keeps tossing

            about, and may go from one bed to another.

- Child cannot tolerate to be uncovered even in this stage, inspite of the burning dry heat of the body.

- Convulsions, copious and frequent desire to urinate, and heat and pain in the eyes.

- Falls into a deep slumber with loud snoring.

Perspiration: - Profuse cold perspiration at night, which abates at daybreak.

Continued meningeal fevers with complete stupor and rapid, very high rise of temperature especially during the night (from 16 h. midnight).

Skin:

Perspires a lot when angry (Cham. Petr. Sep) or nervous (Calc. Ph-ac), and when passing stool (Merc. Verat)

Useful in cases where eruptions fails to break out in cases of measles or other eruptive diseases.

Examination findings:

- Oily perspiration (Chin. Mag-c. Thuj) of a very offensive odor.

- Fiery red or scarlet spots on the skin.

- Gangrenous affections.

- Rough, dirty-looking skin.

Convulsions:

Ailments or aggravation from: Cough, dentition, drinking water or coffee, fever, fright (Calc. Hyos. Ign. Kali-br. Op), injury (Cic. Hyper. Nat-s),

looking at bright or shining objects, masturbation, on attempting to swallow, sight of water (Bell. Canth. Lyss), sleep, strong odors, suppressed

discharges, suppressed eruptions or when they fail to break out, and worms.

Before convulsions:

Shrieking (Cham. Cic).

During convulsions: - Biting of tongue (Art-v. Bufo. Caust. Cic. Cupr-met. Op).

- Clenched thumbs (Bufo. Caust. Cic. Lach. Stann).

- Red face (Cic. Cupr-met. Op) with a stupid look.

- Shrieking (Op).

- Stiff and flexed limbs (Hyos. Plb).

- Clonic # tonic convulsions, which are changeable in character.

- Convulsions of the upper limbs are more marked than those of the lower limbs,

OR they alternate with each other.

- Coughing.

- Diplopia.

- Hydrophobia.

- Intense heat or absolute coldness of the skin.

- Laughing immoderately.

- Masturbation.

- Opisthotonos.

- Spasms of one side of the body (usually l. side), with absolute immobility of the other side.

- Tendency to fall backwards.

- Tetanic rigidity with trismus (Bell. Cic. Hyper. Nux-v. Op. Stry).

- < after 3 h. (after midnight: Nit-ac).

After convulsions: - Cold perspiration, sleepiness, and weakness.

Generals:

Ailments from masturbation, medication like antibiotics or topical steroids, suppressed discharges (suppression of pus from an abscess, suppressed perspiration)

(Asar. Graph. Psor. Sil), and suppressed skin eruptions (Bry. Dulc. Psor. Sulph. Zinc-met.).

Twitching and trembling during sleep (Hyos. Zinc-met.), from fright (Ign. Op) or after emotional excitement (Cocc. Staph).

Desires open air but is worse from any draft, in cloudy, wet weather, and in autumn.

Lack of reaction.

< during and after sleep (Crot-c. Lach. Spong. Sulph) (after a long sleep).

 

[Elaine Lewis]

It’s the first thought whenever violent behavior is mentioned. But again, “violence” is a common symptom in these cases, you can’t prescribe Stramonium just because of that. But there is no doubt

that Stramonium children have been known to attack, bite, spit, pinch, push, hit, rage, glare, kick, throw things, make threats and engage in malicious behavior (not known to apologize like Lyssin).

What does a Stramonium case characteristically have? There is usually the combination of terror along with violence; think about nightmares, night terrors–waking up and recognizing no one, acting

like he sees wild animals coming towards him; fear of bathing and showering and getting the head wet, fear of being alone, fear of being pursued with a desire to escape, run away, fear of dogs, fear of water.

4 rabies.x remedies: Bell. Stram. Hyos. and Lyssin; you’re going to see a lot of over-lap in these remedies; consequently, you’re going to be looking for what separates them from each other.

 

 

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