Hedera helix (Hed) = Efeu/= Lier commune/= Ivy/= Lianen.

 

= „PlanzlichesIod/= Iod.-ähnlich - mager/+ örtliche Anwendung = unverträglich/= Hyos.-ähnlich in Rausch;

Vergiftung: Örtlich/Blasen/Entzündung, innerlich: Wut/Raserei, berauscht, Puls beschleunigt, Verdauungsbeschwerden/Krämpfen/Delirium;

Positiv: Treu/immer da/überlebungsfähig;

Negativ: Lebt in Unruhe + Sorgen + müde, Versucht Angst zu überwinden + Angst steigert; Geist = > frische Luft, klammert in Beziehungen, Appetit # verlangt Appetit/appetitlos + Hungerschmerz,

mager, warm + Schweiß + zittern + braucht Warmflasche im Bett,

>> frische Luft, > > essen/kaltes Baden + erkältet leicht + < kalte Luft, < leere Magen, fröstelt (o. nach)/+ Achselschweiß, Rheuma, Hirn,

Mental depression and skin irritation.

Vertigo with gray spots before eyes; semi-lateral headache (occipital).

Difficult opening of eyelids. objects appear double.

Tonsillitis (Bell-ähnlich in dark-complexioned people). Tense, painful, rumbling.

Pain r.

Loud gurgling in ileo-caecal region. Perityphlitis.

Pressure in testicles/sexual excited/voluptuous tickling at end of urethra. Male genital organs weak. Rheumatic pains after frequent emissions.

Joints: crackling inernal/stiff, contracted,

heaviness of lower limbs

Eruption on upper inner thighs.

Burning heat in tips of fingers.

Bruised pain in small of back and thighs; nightly digging in r. lower limb to toes

Coldness in back and spine.

Skin feels tight/hands feel swollen. Back stiff.

Schleimhäute/Schilddrüse/Gallen-Lebersystem ;

Woody vine, creeping or climbing, evergreen, with stems up to 20–30 m. Holds on to suitably rough surfaces such as trees, cliffs, walls by means of short adhesive rootlets.

            Native range: Europe; naturalised nearly worldwide.

Habitat: Shady woodland, coastal woodland and scrub, preferably calcareous and stones; groves and parks.

Young shoots, petioles, young blades, pedicels and sepals more or less densely hairy.

           Two types of leaves; palmately 5-lobed juvenile leaves on creeping and climbing stems, and unlobed cordate adult leaves on fertile flowering stems exposed to full sun, usually high

            in crowns of trees or top of rock faces.

Flowers greenish-yellow, fragrant, mostly 10–15 per umbel; in terminal, globose umbels, solitary or grouped in racemose panicles.

Fruit a globose drupe, violet-black when ripe.

Main Constituents: Triterpene saponins and their glycosides – hederins and hederacosides in leaves and berries. Polyacetylenesfalcarinol and derivatives; Flavonoids, mainly rutin.

Pharmacological Activities:

The leaves and berries of English ivy could cause toxicosis if ingested. Symptoms include gastrointestinal upset, diarrhoea, hyperactivity, breathing difficulty, coma, fever, polydipsia,

dilated pupils, muscular weakness and lack of coordination. Contact with cell sap may result in severe skin irritation with redness, itching and blisters. Eating the berries may cause

burning in the throat.

Medicinal Uses:

The German Commission E reported that skin and mucosa are sensitive to ivy leaf and it performs correspondingly expectorant and spasmolytic activity. The constituent falcarinol has been confirmed

as having antibacterial, analgesic and sedative effects. The Commission commends ivy leaf as treatment for catarrhs of the respiratory passages and for symptoms of chronic inflammatory bronchial

conditions. Ivy is suggested as an expectorant, secretolytic and antispasmodic in response to, specifically, whooping cough, spastic bronchitis and chronic catarrh.

Ivy has possible effects as an astringent, micro-vessel protector, anti-oedema and antiseptic. Ivy extracts are major constituents in slimming products, especially those that combat cellulitis.

They are found in most of the compositions offered by well-established cosmetic houses. It has vasoconstrictor and anti-exudative properties, and reduces capillary permeability, an action attributed

to its rutin and other flavonoids. It is also reported to be an effective moderator of peripheral sensitivity and can improve tolerance to skin massage. It is likewise noted that Ivy extracts activate the circulation, allow drainage of infiltrated tissue and thereby reduce local inflammation, exerting an anti-oedematous effect and lowering tissue sensitivity.

Mezger’s claim of ivy containing high iodine concentrations could not be confirmed in the literature. Stephenson, observed plenty of thyroid symptoms in Mezger’s proving [see below].

Endocrine System:

‘Among non-marine plants Hedera has one of the highest concentrations of iodine. From this follows its relationship to the symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Indeed, as a keynote one might call

Hedera ‘vegetable iodine.’ There is marked anxiety particularly about the heart, goitre, exophthalmos, sensations of tension in the throat, increased appetite [or loss of], constipation, constrictions and

needle like pains in the heart, palpitations, insomnia, profuse perspiration, a desire for the open air and extreme tiredness.

‘Although, from its iodine content one might expect a similarity of symptoms to Iodum, there appears rather to be a contrast. For instance, unlike the coryza of Iodum, which is < open air,

Hedera > open air. There is throat pain on swallowing [Iodum has pain when not swallowing]. Iodum has suppressed as well as increased urination, whereas Hedera urination is increased.

Hedera has left ovarian pain; Iodum, right. It is primarily in the cardiac sphere that Hedera and Iodum have a similar action. Both have constriction of the heart with piercing, needle-like pains.

Hedera has been of great service in myocardial infarction and should be considered along with our other great heart remedies. Hedera also has the organic hypertrophies of Iodum [prostatic as well

as thyroid]. Therefore Hedera shares with Iodum many of the pathological signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism but contrasts with Iodum in the expansion of these into the subtle sphere of

subjective, physiological response. In this manner Hedera gives us one more effective agent for the individualisation of the treatment of hyperthyroidism.

‘The outstanding symptom not shared either with the clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism or the symptoms of Iodum is a generalised tingling of the joints, muscles and nerves. Clinically, in

homeopathic dilutions, Hedera has been of particular value in hyperthyroidism, gallstones and cholecystitis, and chronic cirrhosis. In gross dilutions it has been used to cure drunkenness, for worms,

late menses, varicose veins and retarded menses.’ [Stephenson, interpretation of Mezger’s proving]

Clinging to a Strong Support

‘The symbolism of the ivy rests on three facts which are that it clings, it thrives in the shade and it is an evergreen. Its clinging has made the ivy a symbol of the traditional, albeit now unpopular, image

of the helpless female clinging to her man for protection. It also signifies true love, faithfulness and undying affection both in marriage and in friendship. Christian symbolists consider the ivy’s need

to cling to a support emblematic of frail humanity’s need for divine support.

‘Like other evergreens, the ivy symbolises eternal life and resurrection. It has been associated with the Egyptian god Osiris and the Greco-Roman god Attis; both of whom were resurrected from the

dead. Medieval Christians, noticing that ivy thrived on dead trees used it to symbolise the immortal soul, which lived even though the body [represented by the dead tree] decayed.

‘In spite of its use as a symbol of immortality, ivy’s association with the grave caused it to be strongly emblematic of mortality. According to Crippen, at Christmas time, ivy, which represents

mortality, should be used only on the outside of buildings because this holiday celebrates Jesus, the giver of everlasting life and destroyer of death.

‘Because it thrives in the shade, ivy represents debauchery, carousing, merry-making, sensuality, the flourishing of hidden desires and the enjoyment of secret or forbidden pleasures. Some even

believed this plant to have demonic associations. Dionysus [Bacchus] the Greco-Roman god of wine, satyrs and Sileni are often wreathed in ivy. Crowns of ivy were believed to prevent intoxication

and thought to aid inspirational thinking. Therefore, the Greeks crowned their poets with wreaths of this plant. Although generally considered poisonous, the ivy’s black berries were used to treat

plague.’ [Tucker 1997]

Clinging to Life

As a vigorous, long-lived evergreen plant, ivy is used to symbolise ‘ever-life’ or eternal life and resurrection. Also associated with the indestructible ivy are other undying qualities, such as true love, faithfulness and everlasting affection both in marriage and in friendship. American writer O. Henry [1862–1910] featured ivy as the main character in his short story

The Last Leaf, which encompasses such themes as courage, faithfulness, undying affection, enduring friendship and the indestructible quality of the gift of love.

Set during a blistery east-coast winter, two young female would-be bohemian artists live in a squatty, old tenement building. Barely scratching a living with their sketches and drawings, they are hit

hard when serious cold takes hold of the city. The more delicate of the two contracts pneumonia. As she lies in bed, sinking each day further towards death, she watches through her window an old

ivy vine climbing half way up a brick wall. Each day the winter winds take a few more of the leaves from their mooring on the stalk. She knows her life will fly away with the falling of the last leaf.

The building houses another artist, an old man experienced in life but a failure in art. He has befriended the girls, witnessing their youthful optimism from his perch of disillusioned old age. His mantra

of years holds that one day he would paint his masterpiece.

The days sweep by, bringing no relief to either the weather or the sick girl. The leaves continue to fall, until there comes the day when only one ivy leaf is left. Both girls are sure the end is near.

Stubbornly, the last leaf clings to its stalk, just as the young woman clings to life. A few more days pass and, miraculously, the leaf still hangs on. The enduring persistence and indestructible vigour of

the ivy leaf finally melt the young woman’s pessimism and embolden her with the courage to get well. And she does, the outcome being a happy ending to the story.

Anyone familiar with O. Henry’s style will know that this is not the end of the story. One day, as the young woman is well on the road to recovery, her friend comes to tell her the news. Their neighbour, the old, would-be masterpiece painter, has died the night before of pneumonia. It happened that he caught a deadly chill while outside painting an ivy leaf on the brick wall the night that the last leaf

fell. He had been right; he did paint his masterpiece.

Hed.: Geomanten sehen in stark wucherndem Efeu einen Zeiger auf so genannte Störzonen, das sind Erdverwerfungen, Wasseradern, Krebspunkte oder ähnliche Unheilsorte, die bei längerfristigem Aufenthalt krankmachenden Einfluss haben. An altem Gemäuer, etwa Burgen oder Schlösser, zeigt wuchernder Efeu den Spukplatz an, eine Eintrittspforte in die andere Welt.

Wie so viele Störzonenzeiger wirkt auch der Efeu als Heilpflanze auf das Immunsystem und birgt eine den Unheilsort neutralisierende Kraft in sich (vergleiche Madejsky: Paracelsusmedizin S. 188). Außerdem ist der Efeu mit dem Ginseng verwandt und beide finden bis heute in der Geriatrie Anwendung. Der Münchener Heilpraktiker Dr. Amann empfiehlt daher zur Erhaltung der Lebenskräfte und als Immunstimulans täglich ein junges Efeublatt frisch zu ernten und zu verzehren. In der modernen Phytotherapie werden die saponinhaltigen Efeublätterextrakte wegen ihrer krampflösenden, Sekret verflüssigenden und antibiotischen Wirkung fast ausschließlich bei Bronchitis oder Keuchhusten genutzt (z.B. ist Efeu enthalten in "Hedera comp." Tropfen von Alcea). Der Signaturenlehre zufolge sollte der immergrüne Efeu - wie auch andere typische Friedhofspflanzen - eher bei Altersbronchitis oder bei chronischer Bronchitis zum Einsatz kommen als in der Kinderheilkunde.

 

MATERIA MEDICA HEDERA HELIX

1 Proving Mezger [Germany], 17 provers, tincture, 1x, 6x, 15x; 1932.

Mind: Anxiety about heart.

Constantly lives in a state of anxiety and worry.

Anxiety uncontrollable.

Anxiety & sensation of constriction in throat; & palpitation of heart. > Open air.

Generals: > Physical exertion/during menses

Restlessness, despite weariness, < waiting.

Heat of sun, hot summer weather <.

Open air > mind/head/coryza/cough/general;

Vertigo: on bending head, rapid movement of head.

Head: Left-sided frontal headache, & coryza, > open air, cold bathing.

Throat: “As if constricted”; tension.

Stomach: Nausea, vomiting, and stomach cramps > eating.

Respiration: Difficult respiration and cough in a warm room.

Chest: Needle-like pain in heart region while talking; awakening with it between 3 - 5 h.

Heart as if having to beat against a strong resistance.

Limbs: Numbness hands on waking, > motion.

 

Repertorium:

Gemüt: Angst/Furcht (FURCHT/vor Herzerkrankung)/Qualvolle Angst

Sorgenvoll

Kopf: Hydrozephalus - chronisch

Schmerz - > im Freien/> kaltes Baden/bei Schnupfen/in Stirn (l.)

Tumoren im Gehirn + Spannung im Kopf

Schwindel: im Allgemeinen

Kopf beugend/> (Kopf)bewegung

Auge: Glaukom und Gefühl „Wie Flackern“

Katarakt

Schmerz („Wie durch Sand“)

Vorwölbung

Ohr: Absonderungen

Geräusche im Ohr, Ohrgeräusche

Schmerz

Nase: Katarrh/Entzündung

Schnupfen (> im Freien/mit Husten/> kaltes Baden)

Gesicht: Hautausschläge – Akne/Lippen

Schmerz - Nebenhöhlen in Stirnhöhle/Trigeminusneuralgie

Mund: Bluten

Hautausschläge (Herpes)

Innerer Hals: Entzündete Rachen/Tonsillen

Zusammenschnürung

Äußerer Hals: Entzündete Schilddrüse - Riedel-Struma/Kropf – Basedow/geschwollene Schilddrüse

Magen: Appetit – fehlend/vermehrt

Schmerz [drückend/> (nach) Essen/krampfartig/in Epigastrium < Druck]

Übel (> nach Essen)

Erbricht > nach Essen

Bauch: Beschwerden der Gallenblase/-wege

Empfindliche Haut

Schmerz im Leber < Atmen 

Beschwerden der Leber/-gegend/ Zirrhose der Leber, Leberzirrhose – chronisch/entzündete Gallenblase/Gallensteine

Rektum: Durchfall/Obstipation/Beschwerden durch Würmer

Stuhl: Blutig/reichlich

Nieren: Beschwerden der Nieren l.

Nierensteine

Schmerz (ausstrahlend/brennend/Wehtun)

Blase: Schmerz < Wasser lassend/> nach Wasser lassen

Harndrang anhaltend bei Frauen/plötzlich/häufig/verzögert, muss warten, bis der Urin zu fließen beginnt

Urin: Reichlich

Sediment - Harngrieß

Prostata: Geschwollen

Weibliche Genitalien: Fluor (brennend/< vor Menses/scharf, wund fressend)

Menses - zu kurz/spärlich/zu spät

Schmerz - Ovarien l. (Uterus)

Atmung: Asthma, asthmatische Atmung [bronchiale Asthma (bei Kindern)]

Auswurf: Gelb

Husten: > im Freien/> kaltes Baden/

< Sprechend

Brust: Angst in Herzgegend/Herzklopfen

Entzündete Bronchien

Zusammenschnürung (Herz)

Pulsieren

Schmerz („Wie durch Nadeln“/< Sprechen/stechend, durchstechend/im Herzen)Rücken: Schmerz in Zervikalregion

Glieder: Entzündete Gelenke

Kälte

Krampfadern in Unterschenkel

Raynaud-Krankheit

Schmerz in Daumen - Gelenke

Steif (morgens/nachts)

Schlaf: Einschlafen nach dem Essen

Erwacht nach Mitternacht - 3 h/häufig/schlaflos > nach Essen

Fieber: Intermittierendes, chronisches Fieber, Wechselfieber bei Rheuma

Schweiß: Reichlich (nach Fieber)

Reichlich nach Frost mit Blutandrang

Haut: gelb/Geschwüre (entzündet)/Hautausschläge - Herpes wiederkehrend

Allgemeines: < im Frühling/< im Herbst/l. (dann r.) Seite/3 h./morgens/> nachmittags (13 - 18 h)/> abends/nachts (nach) Mitternacht (2 h - 2 - 5 h)

Abmagerung

Arteriosklerose

>/< Bewegung/< Bewegungsanfang/> fortgesetzte Bewegung/< (Gehen) im Freien/> Reiben 

Diabetes mellitus

Entzündete Gelenke (rheumatoide Arthritis/Nebenhöhlen chronisch)

Erkältungsneigung

> (beim/nach) Essend (abends)
„Wie Hitze“/Lebenswärmemangel

< Kälte/> kaltes Baden/> kalte Luft/< Wärme

Rachitis

Schmerz (prickelnd)

Speisen und Getränke: <: Alkohol;

Verbrennungen

Müde > bei Anstrengung/> im Freien/> während Menses/Schwäche (> im Freien)

Geschwollene Drüsen

Tb. (Gelenke)

 

Komplementär: Schlangen (Hed = vegetabil)

 

Gut gefolgt von: Apat. Calc-f. Fl-ac. Kali-f. Lap-a. Mag-f. Mag-m. Nat-f.

 

Vergleich: Liebt Ca. meidet Torf. enthält I + Oestrogen-ähnliche Stoffen; Calc-f. Nat-m. Orob-hedere, Spong. VAB. Glech (= Gundelrebe/= Herbe aux goutteux/= Lierre terrestris/= Groundivy/= Gundermann/= Donnerrebe/= Erdefeu/= Erdkränzl/= Gundam/= Huder/= Zieckelkräutchen/= Gartenhopfen/= Erdhopfen/= Donnerkraut/= ale-hoof/= ground-ivy/= gill-over-the ground/= hedgemaid/= creeping jenny).

Scindapsus aures (or Epipremnum aureum = Golden pothos or Devil's ivy air filtering plants. Alismatales.)

Siehe: Apiales + Unterdrückungsgruppe + Liebesgruppe + Kranzgruppe + air filtering plants + Immergrün + Würger + Anhang (Dr. rer. nat. Frank Herfurth)

 

Antidotiert: Nat-s.                                                   

Antidotiert von: Gun.

 

Wirkung: lithämisch/phosphorisch/tuberkulin/syphillitisch/abortiv           

Allerlei: Tod/Dionysos/Osiris/“grünen.Mann. (= Geliebter der Göttin geweiht), Initiationspflanze                             

Symbol für Geselligkeit/Heiterkeit/Treue,

begleitet Querc + Fag,            

klettert mit Haftwurzeln = Erde zum Licht bringen/= wie Schlange o. Erddrachen

Holz schützt gegen Halsweh + Bräune,

Heimat in der Südliche Halbrund und wächst da ohne Stütze hoch?

klont Götter/gibt prophetische Gaben (Orakel)

Das Efeu umrankte Grab gehört zu den häufigen Motiven, die uns auf Friedhöfen begegnen. Wiederum steht die immergrüne Pflanze, die entgegen dem Rhythmus der übrigen Natur mitten im Winter fruchtet, für das ewige Leben. Außerdem bildet der Efeu eine Art Leiter in andere Sphären, da er wie seine Wirtsbäume in der Erde wurzelt und den Stamm entlang dem Himmel entgegenstrebt. Vielleicht zählt man den Efeu aus diesem Grund zu den Totenblumen. Als Grabbepflanzung soll er Freundschaft und Liebe symbolisieren und wird zu Kränzen gewunden, die an Türen aufgehängt einst als Schutz vor Behexung dienten.

Geomanten sehen in stark wucherndem Efeu einen Zeiger auf so genannte Störzonen, das sind Erdverwerfungen, Wasseradern, Krebspunkte oder ähnliche Unheilsorte, die bei längerfristigem Aufenthalt krankmachenden Einfluss haben. An altem Gemäuer, etwa Burgen oder Schlösser, zeigt wuchernder Efeu den Spukplatz an, eine Eintrittspforte in die andere Welt.

Wie so viele Störzonenanzeiger wirkt auch der Efeu als Heilpflanze auf das Immunsystem und birgt eine den Unheilsort neutralisierende Kraft in sich (vergleiche Madejsky: Paracelsusmedizin S. 188). Außerdem ist der Efeu mit dem Ginseng verwandt und beide finden bis heute in der Geriatrie Anwendung. Der Münchener Heilpraktiker Dr. Amann empfiehlt daher zur Erhaltung der Lebenskräfte und als Immunstimulans täglich ein junges Efeublatt frisch zu ernten und zu verzehren. In der modernen Phytotherapie werden die saponinhaltigen Efeublätterextrakte wegen ihrer krampflösenden, Sekret verflüssigenden und antibiotischen Wirkung fast ausschließlich bei Bronchitis oder Keuchhusten genutzt (z.B. ist Efeu enthalten in "Hedera comp." Tropfen von Alcea). Der Signaturenlehre zufolge sollte der immergrüne Efeu -wie auch andere typische Friedhofspflanzen- eher bei Altersbronchitis oder bei chronischer Bronchitis zum Einsatz kommen als in der Kinderheilkunde.

Phytologie: reinigend/auflösend

Vorwort/Suchen                                Zeichen/Abkürzungen                                   Impressum