Biss

 

[Joseph D. Laurie MD]

Poisoned Wounds

Verat-v.: Rapid in removing contamination of the constitution after an envenomed wound, sting, or bite. The wound may be so slight as almost to escape notice, but a sore or fester forms, which soon assumes a threatening aspect, becomes bluish, and discharges a thin ichor, -inflammation, spreading rapidly from it- up the arm or leg, as the case may be. A dose every half hour, then every hour until relief is obtained.

 

[Zeit Online]

Hundebisse

In Deutschland beißen Hunde jedes Jahr zwischen 18.000 und 40.000 Menschen (Deutsches Ärzteblatt: Rothe et al, 2015). Männer werden doppelt so häufig gebissen wie Frauen. Im Durchschnitt sterben 1-6 Menschen in Deutschland jährlich an einem Biss. In den USA sollen sogar 5 Millionen Menschen pro Jahr gebissen werden, einer von 100-200 Menschen in der Notaufnahme kommt wegen eines Hundebisses (Microbiology Spectrum: Jacob & Lorber, 2015).

Wundinfektionen

Bis zu ein Viertel aller Hundebisse infiziert sich (Deutsches Ärzteblatt: Rothe et al, 2015). Kinder und Menschen mit chronischen Erkrankungen oder einem schlechten Immunsystem sind besonders gefährdet. Die Infektion stammt meist von Bakterien der Mundflora des Hundes. Besonders gefährlich ist das anaerobe Bakterium Capnocytophaga canimorsus, das häufig eine Blutvergiftung auslöst (Microbiology Spectrum: Jacob & Lorber, 2015).

Behandlung

Die Wunde sollte von einem Arzt gereinigt und ausgespült werden. Eine prophylaktische Therapie mit Antibiotika ist nicht zwingend notwendig, obwohl sie bei Bissen der Hand angezeigt sein kann (Cochrane: Medeiros et al, 2001). Extrem wichtig ist es, eine Tetanus-Impfung nachzuholen, sollte der Gebissene nicht geimpft sein. In bestimmten Gebieten muss auch gegen Tollwut geimpft werden (Deutsches Ärzteblatt: Rothe et al, 2015).

 

[Eileen Nauman]

BITES [(Wild) Animal or Human]

DEFINITION: Any domestic or wild animal bite can be quite dangerous, due to the possibility of rabies, especially with raccoons, squirrels, skunks, bats, foxes, coyotes, and dogs, to name a few.

However, a HUMAN bite is dangerous for many reasons: the transmission of HIV, AIDS, or Hepatitis B are examples. Plus, the human mouth is one of the dirtiest and most germ laden! The spread of infection from a human bite is very dangerous. Never treat a human bite lightly. Seek medical treatment as soon as possible.

TREATMENT for Human Bite:

EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONSE:

1. Stop any bleeding with direct pressure. Splint or bandage the bite location and keep it immobilized.

2. Use a dry, sterile dressing.

3. Transport to a hospital so the bite can be cleaned surgically and antibiotic therapy can be given by the doctor.

1. Go to the doctor or emergency room and allow them to do what they need to do first.

2. Then, put 1 teaspoon of Calendula or Hypericum Ø in a quart of water (1:10) and vigorously flush the area 3x daily with this application.

NOTE: If the wound site is a puncture wound, do not use Calendula Ø. Instead, use only Hypericum Ø to flush the wound site.

3. Arnica montana 30C, each dose an hour apart, for swelling, tissue damage, and shock. Up to six doses.

4. If the wound becomes infected, see a doctor, plus take Pyrogenium 30C, one dose three times daily for one day. See your doctor and consult a homeopath.

5. Get tested at the appropriate times for Hepatitis B, HIV, and AIDS.

Get the person who bit you tested on these three disease forms. If you test positive, see your homeopath immediately for follow-up homeopathic constitutional treatment.

 

TREATMENT for SMALL Wild Animal Bites (Incl. dog bites)

EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONSE:

1. Stop any bleeding with a dry sterile dressing and with direct pressure over the wound site. If that does not work, apply indirect pressure on either the brachial or femoral artery.

2 Flush the wound site with clean water for at least 3 minutes. Then wash with soap and clean water. If you have access to a turkey baster, squirt the fluid into the wound under as much pressure

as possible. Bandage the bite location and keep it immobilized.

3. Splint and immobilize the area, if possible.

4. Treat for shock if necessary.

5. Check their breathing. If they have stopped, perform CPR.

6. Transport to a hospital so the wound can be cleaned surgically and appropriate antibiotic therapy can be given.

LATER, with dog bites and rabies concerns:

1. Check with local authorities for specifics. If the person is bitten by any animal, there must be concern for rabies. Trap the animal or dog the best you can, without being bitten yourself.

Call your city or county animal control with a description of the animal. If a dog, find out who it belongs to and get their address. Report this information to your health department officials as soon as possible.

2. Rabies, if left untreated, will kill a person.

3. Get immediate emergency medical attention.

4. Wash and flush wound as above. This will reduce possible rabies infection by 50%!

5. Any unprovoked attacks by any animal should be considered dangerous, as they may have rabies. Even if you are not bitten, report this as soon as possible to health department officials.

6. Rabies has a long incubation period. Head wounds will show the symptoms much sooner.

 

TREATMENT for LARGE Wild Animal Bites (Bear, alligator, bull, buffalo, large cat—cougar/lynx, or boar/peccary)

EMERGENCY MEDICAL RESPONSE: If you are in the woods or an area where help is not nearby.

1. Check the area for everyone's safety (yourself). If it is a GRIZZLY bear, do NOT look it in the eye and do NOT run. Just slowly back away from the person and the bear. When the bear leaves,

go care for the person. If you are confronted with a BLACK or BROWN bear, cougar/lynx, make a lot of noise—yell, scream, wave your arms, and show very aggressive behavior toward it.

The animal will usually leave and then you can care for the person.

2. Check their airway, breathing, and pulse. If not breathing, perform CPR.

3. Assess for multiple, major wounds. This may involve open wounds, puncture wounds, fractures, head, neck, back/spinal column, or throat injuries, or internal injuries.

4. Stop any bleeding with a dry sterile dressing and with direct pressure over the wound site. If that does not work, apply indirect pressure on either the brachial rr femoral artery.

5. Flush the wound site with clean water for at least 3 minutes. Then wash with soap and clean water. If you have access to a turkey baster, squirt the fluid into the wound under as much pressure as possible. Bandage the bite location and keep it immobilized.

6. Splint and immobilize the area, if possible.

7. Treat for shock if necessary. If there are head, neck, or chest injuries, do NOT elevate the person's feet.

8. Transport to a hospital or get help as soon as the person is comfortable and you've done all you can at that time—especially if out in the woods or in some area where help is not nearby.

HOMEOPATHIC: If in the woods and not near any emergency help and assuming you are carrying a homeopathic first aid kit with you.

1. Arnica 30C, one dose every 15 minutes for bleeding and shock. Up to six doses.

2. Aconitum napellus 30C, one dose every 15 minutes if shock symptoms persist after the Arnica Montana has been taken 6x. Up to six doses.

 

Wunden und Stiche

Splitterverletzungen

Hyper.: besonders in nervenreichen Geweben C 30 1x, bei Bedarf wiederholen

Sil.: befördert Fremdkörper an die Körperoberfläche, besonders Glassplitterverletzungen im Gesicht (gute kosmetische Ergebnisse!) C 30 auflösen

Stichwunden

Arn.: Schockbekämpfung, Blutstillung, Wundschmerz C 200 1x

Led.: jede Art von Stichverletzung (Tetanusgefahr): Nägel, Dornen, Stacheln, Insekten, Katzenbisse (spitze Zähne!) < Wärme, Schmerz dumpf-stechend

            C 30 auflösen

C 200 1x bei Tetanusgefahr

Eitrige Wunden

Hep.: warme Auflage lindert C 200 auflösen

Merc.: kalte Auflage lindert C 30 auflösen Bluterguss

Sul-ac.: unregelmäßige Ränder, wie ausgefranst C 30 auflösen

Led.: glatter Rand, kalte Auflage lindert C 30 auflösen

Bißwunden

AUSBLUTEN LASSEN oder ZUM BLUTEN BRINGEN!

Arn.: Schockbekämpfung, Blutstillung, Wundschmerz C 200 1x

Nach ARNICA-Gabe Wundreinigung mit CALENDULA-Tinktur oder ECHINACEA-Tinktur.

Hyper.: Verletzung in nervenreichem Gewebe, Schmerz zieht die Nervenbahn entlang, C 30 1x, bei Bedarf wiederholen

Led.: Bißwunde - Tetanusprophylaxe! Wunde fühlt sich kalt an; trotzdem > kalte Auflagen. C 200 1x

Hydrophobinum (= Lyssinum): Tollwutverdacht C 1000 2 Gaben im Abstand von 5 - 10 Minuten

Rißwunde: auch an Calendula denken!

 

[Cornelia Richardson-Boedler]

Spider bites and tick bites need diagnostic differentiation in clinical and forensic investigation, particularly if associated with severe systemic illness. This article, continuing part I of the Winter 2007 issue of The Forensic Examiner, compares envenomation by brown spiders (Sicariidae), six-eyed crab spiders (Sicariidae), and sac spiders (Clubionidae) to tick-transmitted or other zoonotic illnesses, including babesiosis (with notes on Rocky Mountain spotted fever), Lyme disease, tularemia, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, and African tick-bite fever. Spider bites, compared to tick bites, are more readily necrotic and present sooner with systemic symptoms. Vasodilation therapies, facilitating the venom’s entry into the blood at bite sites, are warned against.

Sicariidae, Genus Loxosceles

Recent reviews from the U.S. (Hogan, Barbaro, & Winkel, 2004; Swanson & Vetter, 2005; Wendell, 2003) and Brazil (da Silva et al., 2004), as well as recent clinical and epidemiological studies from Tennessee, U.S. (Sams et al., 2001), and Santa Catarina, Brazil (Sezerino et al., 1998), have addressed the public health threat of necrotic and systemic loxoscelism, with yet some uncertainties and controversies regarding therapies.

 

 

Vorwort/Suchen.                               Zeichen/Abkürzungen.                                   Impressum.